Namibia

Transportation

Transportation - Get In


By plane

Hosea Kutako International Airport, located 45 minutes east of Windhoek, is the main entry point for air traffic. Air Namibia operates flights from Frankfurt, Cape Town, Johannesburg, Victoria Falls, Maun, Harare, Lusaka, Luanda. South African Airways British Airways, Airlink, South African Express and no-frills Kulula.comoperate flights to and from South Africa. TAAG Angola Airlines operates flights to Luanda.


By car

There are 9 commonly used border posts with neighbouring counties:

Angola

  • Oshikango (Santa Clara),  +264 (0)65 26-4615fax: +264 (0)65 26-4616.
  • Ruacana+264 (0)65 27-0290fax: +264 (0)65 27-0010

Botswana

  • Buitepos (Mamuno),  +264 (0)62 56-0404fax: +264 (0)62 56-0418. On the Trans-Kalahari-Highway, connecting the B6 and A2 between Gobabis and Ghanzi
  • Mhembo (Shakawe),  +264 (0)66 25-9900fax: +264 (0)66 25-9902.

South Africa

  • Araimsvlei (Naroegas),  +264 (0)63 28-0057fax: +264 (0)63 28-0058. Connecting the B3 and N14 between Karasburg and Upington
  • Verloorsdrift (Onseepkaans),  +264 (0)63 26-9134. Connecting the C10 and R358 between Karasburg and Pofadder
  • Noordoewer (Vioolsdrift),  +264 (0)63 29-7122fax: +264 (0)63 29-7021. Connecting the B1 and N7 between Keetmanshoop and Springbok
  • Oranjemund (Alexander Bay),  +264 (0)63 23-2756fax: +264 (0)63 23-3483.

Zambia

  • Wenela (Sesheke),  +264 (0)66 25-3430fax: +264 (0)66 25-2293.

By International bus

The most convenient international bus services into Namibia run from Cape Town, Victoria Falls, Johannesburg and Gaborone.

  • Intercape Minaliner [www] have buses from Windhoek to Victoria Falls, Capetown, and the Angola border.
  • Monnakgotla travel have a bus two times a week from Windhoek Namibia to Gaborone Botswana.
  • Insight Luxury Coaches have a bus two times a week from Windhoek to Livingstone Zambia. fares are from N$450. which is less than the fare with Intercape

By train

The regular overnight train from Upington in South Africa to Windhoek, operated by TransNamib, has been discontinued. It is no longer possible to get into or out of Namibia by train.

Transportation - Get Around


By car

Despite the vast distances in Namibia, most people get around by land, and not air. If renting a car, plan to have plenty of cash on hand to fill the tank with gasoline. Gas stations typically do not accept any form of payment except cash. A small tip for the attendant pumping your gasoline of NAD 3-5 is quite common. If you are on the back roads of Namibia, it's always wise to stop and top-off your tank when you see a service station.

Namibia's roads are very good, with primary routes paved, and secondary routes of well-graded gravel. An all-wheel drive vehicle is not necessary except on tertiary roads and the Skeleton Coast. Driving at night is very dangerous because there is a lot of wildlife on the roads. Traffic drives on the left. Namibian roads eat tires. Always check your spare and inspect your tires often. Its a good idea to purchase the tire insurance that your rental car company might offer, too.

Namibia has some of the worst road accident statistics per head of population. Self-driving tourists "score" in the 'no other party involved' accident category, losing control of their cars for no apparent reason but speed. Driving on dirt roads is unlike any other driving experience that Europeans or North Americans can gain at home, and the 100km/h speed limit does not mean you should, or even can, drive safely at that speed.

Namibians often estimate the time to drive between places according to their own vast experience driving quickly on dirt (untarred) roads. Add a third and you will arrive alive with kidneys intact! Keep in mind that this farmer overtaking you at breakneck speed knows every rock and every puddle on this road, has a better suitable car, less load, and likely a few hundred thousand kilometers of experience on his belt.

Before you reserve a car let the rental company send you a copy of its rental agreement. Most of them have many (and sometimes absolutely ridiculous) restrictions. Take your time to compare them according to your needs.

  • AAA Car Hire,  +264 811 246 286fax: +264 61 244558, e-mail: . Sedan, 4WD and bus rentals in Namibia.

By taxi

There are two types of taxi services in Namibia: shared taxis and dedicated taxis, often called "radio taxis" or "call-a cab". The shared taxis have a license restricting their movement, either to within a town, or between a set of towns. Taxi fares of shared taxis are regulated by government and cannot be bargained on. However, taxi drivers might nevertheless overcharge tourists who do not know what the standard fares are. Radio taxis have no such restriction but charge between 5 and 10 times for the same ride.

Shared taxis are seldom roadworthy - any car in Namibia must pass the roadworthy test only upon change of ownership. It is not uncommon to see bonnets tied by steel wire, emergency spare tyres, broken screens, and the like. Drivers habitually jump red lights (in Namibia: "robots") and stop signs and will let passengers embark wherever they find them, including on highways and in the middle of an intersection. Be considerate to other drivers by not waving at a taxi where it is not safe to stop.

It is quite easy to get around towns by long-distance shared taxis. They are fast, sometimes scarily so, and they are cheap. Just ask around to find out where the taxi rank is (sometimes there are several taxi ranks, each one with departures to different areas of the country). None of these will take you to tourist destinations, though, as those are almost always away from the larger settlements. For taxis that operate within a town it is expected that you, instead of waving at them, point into the direction you wish to travel.

A lot of companies offer affordable shuttle services between most towns like Windhoek, Swakopmund, Walvis Bay, Tsumeb, Otjiwarongo etc. These services are perfectly safe but more expensive than taxis.


By bus

  • TransNamib. Operates air-conditioned buses (and trains) to destinations all over Namibia via their StarLine service.

By train

The national railway company of Namibia, TransNamib, operates trains (and buses) to destinations all over Namibia via their StarLine passenger service. Some routes available are

  • Windhoek-Otjiwarongo-Tsumeb
  • Windhoek-Gobabis
  • Windhoek-Swakopmund-Walvis Bay
  • Windhoek-Keetmanshoop (formerly also to Upington in South Africa but not any more)
  • Walvis Bay-Swakopmund-Tsumeb

The StarLine scheduled service conveys passengers via special coaches hooked on the back of freight trains. These passenger coaches offer comfortable airline-style seating with air-conditioning and (sometimes) video entertainment. Vending machines provide refreshments on long journeys. StarLine,  +264 (0)61 298-2032fax: +264 (0)61 298-2495, e-mail:

Other rail services operating in the country are:

  • Desert Express,  +264 (0)61 298-2600fax: +264 (0)61 298-2601, e-mail: . The Desert Express is a luxury tourist train that traverses Namibia regularly, taking tourists to such destinations as Walvis Bay, Swakopmund and Etosha National Park. Buses are used to transport visitors from train stations to the various sights.

By plane

  • Westwing,  +264 (61) 221091fax: +264 (61) 232778, e-mail: . Offers both scheduled and charter flights throughout the country

By tour

Several tour companies operate in Namibia. Each is unique in services offered but most operate with safety in mind.

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