New Delhi

Introduction

Info New Delhi


introduction

New Delhi introduction


New Delhi is a municipality and district in Delhi which serves as the capital and seat of government of India. In addition, it also serves as the seat of Government of Delhi. The foundation stone of the city was laid by George V, Emperor of India during the Delhi Durbar of 1911.

Delhi is known as a microcosm of India and is a leading world city with strengths in arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism and transport all contributing to its prominence.

Although colloquially Delhi and New Delhi as names are used interchangeably to refer to the jurisdiction of NCT of Delhi, these are two distinct entities, and the latter is a small part of the former.


info

New Delhi info


POPULATION : City: 249,998 / Metro: 21,753,486
FOUNDED :  1911
TIME ZONE : IST (UTC+5:30)
LANGUAGE : English ( widely spoken) , Hindi 41%, Bengali 8.1%, Telugu 7.2%, Marathi 7%, Tamil 5.9%, Urdu 5%, Gujarati 4.5%, Kannada 3.7%, Malayalam 3.2%, Oriya 3.2%, Punjabi 2.8%, Others 6.4%
RELIGION : Hinduism 79.8%, Muslims 12.9%, Sikhs 5%, Others 2.3%
AREA : 42.7 km2 (16.5 sq mi)
ELEVATION : 216 m (709 ft)
COORDINATES : 28°36′50″N 77°12′32″E
SEX RATIO : Male: 51.70%  
 Female: 48.30%
ETHNIC : Indo-Aryan 72%, Dravidian 25%, Mongoloid and other 3%
AREA CODE : 11
POSTAL CODE :
DIALING CODE : +91 11
WEBSITE : www.ndmc.gov.in


Tourism

New Delhi tourism


The Government of India Tourist Office, 88 Janpath, Connaught Place,  +91 11 2332 0005, +91 11 2332 0008, +91 11 2332 0109, +91 11 2332 0266. The Government of India Tourist Office offers daily tours, covering all of the major Delhi sites. If you should choose to go with the government-sanctioned day tour, be aware that due to the heavy agenda, you will need to have a quick foot, only 20-40 min are given for each sight, which is next to no time. Consider this day tour as a sampler. If there is a sight of particular interest, bookmark it and return at a later date.

Red Fort (Lal Qila). is one of Delhi's top tourist sights and listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. A brilliant red sandstone fort built by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan (who also built Agra's Taj Mahal) as his ruling palace. Completed in 1648, the years since have not treated the buildings kindly: the rooms have long since been stripped of all objects, the marble inlays are long gone and quite a few buildings are off limits. Still, the scale remains imposing and the gardens are kept lush and green even in midwinter.

Humayun's Tomb  (in south Delhi, near Hazrat Nizamuddin station). daily from sunrise to sunset. is one of Delhi's three UNESCO World Heritage Sites. - The tomb is in large, immaculately maintained gardens in the Persian Char Bagh (four corners) style that were thoroughly renovated in 2003 with the Aga Khan's help and are consequently probably the best in Delhi. As you enter the complex, the first major structure on your right is the bulbous, octagonal tomb of Iza Khan, a court noble who built it in his own lifetime, some 20 years before Humayun's tomb. As you pass through the first gate, you will glimpse the dome of the tomb and enter a floral path leading to the second (West) gate, which now acts as the entrance to the giant central garden.

Qutub Minar  (in Mehrauli, Qutub Minar station on the Metro Yellow Line, bus to DTC Lado Sarai Terminal). daily from sunrise to sunset. This complex , houses structures dating from the Slave Dynasty (1206-1290) and is designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The gardens are kept in excellent shape, making this a popular relaxation and picnic spot. Light-and-sound show held most nights after sunset. - This is the 2nd tallest minar 73 m in India after Minar-E-Fateh at Chhapar Chiri at Anandpur Sahib which stands 100 m tall, built in memory of great victory of Sikh forces led by Baba Banda Singh Bahadur over the mughal forces. The most famous structure on grounds, this 72.5 m minaret was the tallest "skyscraper" in the world when built (1193-1368) - it was constructed on the orders of Qutb-ud-din Aybak. Qutub Minar originally an ancient Islamic Monument, inscribed with Arabic inscriptions, and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Purana Qila (Old Fort), Purana Qila, Mathura Road (Near Delhi Zoo). Purana Qila is the walled citadel of Mughal Emperor Humayun. Believed to be built during the time of mythical Pandava rule, significant additions were made by Humayun itself. It later turned into an urban village before being a monument.

New Delhi is home to several historic sites and museums. The National Museum which began with an exhibition of Indian art and artefacts at the Royal Academy in London in the winter of 1947–48 was later at the end was shown at the Rashtrapati Bhawan in 1949. Later it was to form a permanent National Museum. On 15 August 1949, the National Museum was formally inaugurated and currently has 200,000 works of art, both of Indian and foreign origin, covering over 5,000 years.

The India Gate built in 1931 was inspired by the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. It is the national monument of India commemorating the 90,000 soldiers of the Indian Army who lost their lives while fighting for the British Raj in World War I and the Third Anglo-Afghan War.

New Delhi is home to Indira Gandhi Memorial Museum, National Gallery of Modern Art, National Museum of Natural History, National Rail Museum, National Handicrafts and Handlooms Museum, National Philatelic Museum, Nehru Planetarium, Shankar's International Dolls Museum. and Supreme Court of India Museum.


History

New Delhi history


With evidence of continuous settlement dating back to the 6th Century BC, Delhi is one of the oldest inhabited cities in the world. The legendary city of Indraprastha from the epic Mahabharata is said to have been situated where Delhi now lies. Thought to have been built and destroyed eleven times, evidence of at least eight distinct settlements can still be seen in Delhi.

  • Qila Rai Pithora – This dates back to the 10th century A.D. as per available historical records. Also known as Rai Pithora, this city was the capital during the reign of Prithviraj Chauhan, the local hero famous for his first defeating, before finally losing to, the marauding invaders from central Asia (Muhammad Ghori in particular). Chauhan's ancestors are said to have captured the city from the Tomar Rajputs who were credited with founding Delhi. Anangpal, a Tomar ruler possibly created the first known regular fort here called 'Lal Kot', which was taken over by Prithviraj and the city extended. Some of the ruins of the fort ramparts are still visible around Qutab Minar and Mehrauli.
  • Mehrauli – Muhammad Ghori managed to defeat Prithviraj Chauhan in battle in 1192. Ghori left his slave Qutub-ud-din Aibak as his viceroy, who in turn captured Delhi the subsequent year. After Ghori's death in 1206, Aibak proclaimed himself the ruler of Delhi and founded the slave dynasty. Qutb-ud-din contributed significantly in terms of architecture by getting Mehrauli built. His most prominent contribution is the starting of Qutab Minar. This 72.5m tall tower was built across three generations and finally completed in 1220AD. A visitor to the Qutab Minar could also see the mausoleum of Kaki, Shamsi Talao and some other mosques. The Slave dynasty ruled until 1290, among them was Razia Sultan who ruled for just three years, but became a historic figure for being the first empress in India.
  • Vasant Kunj – Tomb of Sultan Ghari: The octagonal tomb of Nasir ud din Mahmud, son of Mamluk dynasty ruler, Iltutmish is also situated in the area near Rangpuri. The tomb built by Iltutmish in 1231, after his son's death in 1229. The fortified structure, which surrounds the tomb and the inner chamber (crypt) of the tomb itself, are one of finest examples of Mamluk dynasty architecture, which also include the Qutub Minar in Mehrauli.
  • Siri - Qutuddin Aibaq's 'Slave Dynasty' was followed by the line of Khilji (or Khalji) rulers. The most prominent among the six rulers was Allauddin who extended the kingdom to the south of Narmada and also established the city of 'Siri'. Among some of the remaining ruins, is part of the Siri Fort in the greater Hauz Khas area. The madrasa at Hauz Khas was constructed during Allauddin's reign and bears the stamp of West Asian architecture. Hauz Khas is more often visited today for the chic botiques and restaurants.
  • Tughlakabad - Exactly as it happens during the fall of a lineage of kings, after the Khilji's there was administrative chaos for sometime as the last Khilji ruler was slain by Nasruddin Mohammed. Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq (a Turk governor) invaded Delhi in the 1320s, started the Tughlaq dynasty, and founded the city of Tughlakabad, the ruins of which still remain. His descendant Muhammad Bin Tughlaq raised the fort walls, created another city called Jahapanah (which enclosed the area between Siri and Qila Rai Pithora). Tughlakabad continued, however, to be the main capital city. Muhammad Bin Tughlaq is also known as the mad king for wanting to move the capital from Delhi to Daulatabad (now near Aurangabad in Maharashtra) and making the entire population travel, only to return in a few years because of water shortage in the new town.
  • Firozabad - Muhammad Bin Tughlaq's son, Firoze created the next city which was called Firozabad or Firoze Shah Kotla. There still are some ruins which are visible around the cricket stadium by the same name. The city was an enclosed a large area, and contained many palaces, mosques, pillared halls, and multi-floored water tank. Firoze Shah also planted a 1500 year old Ashokan Pillar on top of the palace. This pillar was originally planted in Meerut by Samrat Ashok.Feroze Shah, also repaired many of the older construction in Delhi including Ghori's tomb, Qutub Minar,Suraj Kund and Hauz Khas. He, himself, was buried inside a lofty tomb in Hauz Khas. Quite like earlier, after Feroze Shah's death, the sultnate became unstable and weak, and was invaded by Taimur the Lame (from Samarkhand) who created havoc in the city by looting, killing, raping and plundering. The Sayyids and Lodhis who ruled Delhi after the Tughlaq's paid more attention to re-establishing miltiary and political stability to the kingdom. The only relevant architecture visible from this period are the tombs at Lodhi Gardens. The last of the Lodhi's was defeated by Babur in the first battle of Panipat. Babur then proceeded to establish the Mughal dynasty.
  • Shergarh - Babur's son Humayun ruled the kingdom for a few years only to be defeated by Sher Shah Suri (1540), who established the new city Shergarh (on the ruins of Dinpanah, built by Humayun) towards the north and near the river. Shergarh is what you see at Purana Qila today, near the Delhi zoo. After Humayun came back to power, he completed the construction and proceeded to rule from Shergarh.
  • Shahjahanabad - the next of the Mughal emperors chose to move away from Delhi and established Agra as the capital of their kingdom. Shahjahan (Humayun's great-grandson) returned to Delhi and established Shahjahanabad. This included the Jama Masjid, the Red Fort and all that in enclosed within the walls of Old Delhi. This wall is still around in many parts and three of the six gates (Delhi gate, Lahori Gate, Turkman Gate, Ajmeri Gate, Kashmiri Gate, Mori Gate)to Delhi still exist. Kashmiri Gate was reconstructed and widened by the British after the 1857 revolt.
  • Lutyen's New Delhi - The final city as you see today expanded from what Sir Edwin Lutyens. The population of Delhi is a heterogeneous mix of people originally belonging to different parts of North India and beyond. Among the prominent North Indian communities are the Punjabis. Delhi also has a prominent South Indian Community, primarily in areas like Karol Bagh, RK Puram, Mayur Vihar and Munirka. A Bengali Settlement, the Chittaranjan Park in south Delhi is the Mini Calcutta of Delhi. Quality education also draws students from different states, making up one of the most diverse student populations in the country.

The descendants of the builders of Delhi's many Muslim monuments no longer stay in Delhi. Most of them migrated to Pakistan during the Partition, with only a small, ever-diminishing community in Old Delhi keeping old courtly traditions alive. The city is rich in monuments and there are 174 ASI protected monuments in the grand capital of India.


Climate

New Delhi climate


The climate of New Delhi is a monsoon-influenced humid subtropical climate with high variation between summer and winter in terms of both temperature and rainfall.

The temperature varies from 46 °C (115 °F) in summers to around 0 °C (32 °F) in winters.

The area's version of a humid subtropical climate is noticeably different from many other cities with this climate classification in that it features long and very hot summers, relatively dry and mild winters, a monsoonal period, and dust storms.

Summers are long, extending from early April to October, with the monsoon season occurring in the middle of the summer.

Winter starts in November and peaks in January. The annual mean temperature is around 25 °C (77 °F); monthly daily mean temperatures range from approximately 14 to 34 °C (57 to 93 °F).

The average annual rainfall is 784 millimetres (30.9 in), most of which is during the monsoons in July and August.

 ClimateJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec
 
Daily highs (°C)21.023.529.236.039.238.834.733.634.233.028.322.9
Nightly lows (°C)7.610.115.321.625.927.826.826.324.719.613.28.5
Precipitation (mm)1920152125702372351131799
             

Source: w:Delhi#Climate


Geography

New Delhi geography


With a total area of 42.7 km2 (16.5 sq mi), New Delhi forms a small part of the Delhi metropolitan area. Because the city is located on the Indo-Gangetic Plain, there is little difference in elevation across the city.

New Delhi and surrounding areas were once a part of the Aravalli Range,  all that is left of those mountains is the Delhi Ridge, which is also called the Lungs of Delhi. While New Delhi lies on the floodplains of the Yamuna River, it is essentially a landlocked city. East of the river is the urban area of Shahdara.

New Delhi falls under the seismic zone-IV, making it vulnerable to earthquakes.


Economy

New Delhi economy


New Delhi is the largest commercial city in northern India. It has an estimated net State Domestic Product (FY 2010) of ₹1595 billion (US$23 billion) in nominal terms and ~₹6800 billion (US$100 billion) in PPP terms.

Connaught Place, one of North India's largest commercial and financial centres, is located in the northern part of New Delhi. Adjoining areas such as Barakhamba Road, ITO are also major commercial centres. Government and quasi government sector was the primary employer in New Delhi. The city's service sector has expanded due in part to the large skilled English-speaking workforce that has attracted many multinational companies. Key service industries include information technology, telecommunications, hotels, banking, media and tourism.

The 2011 World Wealth Report ranks economic activity in New Delhi at 39, but overall the capital is ranked at 37, above cities like Jakarta and Johannesburg.New Delhi with Beijing shares the top position as the most targeted emerging markets retail destination among Asia-Pacific markets.


Subdivisions

New Delhi subdivisions


New Delhi
New Delhi, or the central part of what is now called the National Capital Territory of Delhi, is the British built capital of India. Characterized by its wide boulevards, many roundabouts (traffic circles), colonial mansions, and government buildings dotted with monuments from various parts of India's history, this is the heart of the capital. Amongst the many popular tourist attractions located here are Humayun's Tomb, Purana Qila and the Lodhi gardens and tombs. Connaught Place (now called Rajiv Chowk) and Khan Market are popular shopping centres and the nearby Paharganj area has many inexpensive hotels. New Delhi Railway Station and Nizamuddin Railway Stations for trains to the south and east are in New Delhi. Delhi Metro lines radiate out from the city centre so the area is well connected.


South Delhi
South Delhi contains the upmarket neighbourhoods of Delhi and has a high concentration of five star hotels, numerous smaller hotels and guest houses, shopping malls and markets, and restaurants. It is also the most accessible from the airport, with numerous overpasses constructed in 2011 making it easy to get around by car or taxi. The area is served by three metro lines: the violet line, the yellow line, and the airport express. The Qutab Minar, a major tourist attraction in Delhi, is located in this area (on the yellow line).


North Delhi
Developed mainly during the days of British rule, this area is known for its Raj era buildings and institutions. Metcalfe House, the home of the British resident at the time of Indian rebellion of 1857; Maidens Hotel, a Raj era hotel now run by the Oberoi group; the buildings of Delhi University, all lie in this area. Delhi's Tibetan refugees settled here at Majnu Ka Tilla, an area that has become a popular backpacker hangout. North Delhi is served mainly by the yellow line of the Delhi Metro.


North Eastern Delhi


East Delhi


Central Delhi


South West Delhi


West Delhi


North West Delhi



Internet, Comunication

New Delhi internet, comunication


Cell phone coverage in the city is excellent. There are many service providers offering a wide variety of plans. Among them are Airtel, Vodafone, Reliance, and Tata Indicom. It might be a good idea to buy a cell phone and use one of those prepaid plans to get yourself connected while you are in the city.

Phone numbers in Delhi begin with 011, typically followed by eight digits. To call Delhi from outside India you will need to dial the international prefix for your country, followed by India’s country code 91. If you want to dial a landline no. from a mobile, then you have to add 011 before the number.

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