NAGOYA

Introduction

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Info Nagoya

introduction

Nagoya is the largest city in the Chūbu region of Japan. It is Japan's third-largest incorporated city and the fourth most populous urban area. It is located on the Pacific coast on central Honshu. It is the capital of Aichi Prefecture and is one of Japan's major ports along with those of Tokyo,Osaka, Kobe, Yokohama,Chiba, and Kitakyushu. It is also the center of Japan's third-largest metropolitan region, known as the Chūkyō Metropolitan Area. As of 2010, 2.27 million people lived in the city, part of Chūkyō Metropolitan Area's 9.10 million people.

info

POPULATION :• Designated city 2,283,289 
• Metro 9,107,414 
FOUNDED : 
TIME ZONE : Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)
LANGUAGE : Japanese
RELIGION : observe both Shinto and Buddhist 84%, other 16% (including Christian 0.7%)
AREA : 326.43 km2 (126.04 sq mi)
ELEVATION :
COORDINATES : 35°11′N 136°54′E
SEX RATIO : Male: 48.50
 Female: 51.50
ETHNIC : Japanese 98.5%, Koreans 0.5%, Chinese 0.4%, other 0.6%
AREA CODE : 52
POSTAL CODE :
DIALING CODE : +81 52
WEBSITE :  Official Website

Tourism

The hub of the Aichi region, Nagoya is Japan's fourth-largest city after Tokyo, Yokohama and Osaka and one of the nation's major economic centers. In terms of manufacturing, as home to auto-making giants Toyota, Honda, Mitsubishi Motors, Nagoya is to Japan what Detroit is to the United States — which, along with having been completely flattened during World War II, also explains why it's not one of Japan's top tourist draws and most tourists just zip through on the bullet train on their way between Tokyo and Kyoto. But if you do decide to stick around, there are plenty of car-related attractions, a restored castle, an ancient shrine and surprisingly happening nightlife.


Museums

Nagoya has multiple museums, including traditional and modern art, handicrafts to industrial high-tech, natural and scientific museums.

Nagoya Castle's collection is from the Owari Tokugawa era. The main tower is a museum that details the history of the castle and the city. The Honmaru Palace, destroyed in World War II, is slated for reconstruction by 2016 and will again be a prime example of the Shoin-zukuri architecture of the feudal era. Tokugawa Art Museumis a private museum belonging to the Owari Tokugawa, who lived in Nagoya castle for 16 generations. Among other things, it contains 10 designated national Treasures of Japan, including some of the oldest scrolls of The Tale of Genji. The Nagoya Noh Theatre houses various precious objects of Noh theatre. The Nagoya City Museumshowcases the history of the town.

Yōki-sō is a villa and gardens located in Chikusa-ku, close to Nittai-ji. It was constructed in the Taisho era for Ito Jirozaemon Suketami XV, the first president of Matsuzakaya.

Paintings and sculpture are exhibited at the Nagoya City Art Museum. Modern art is displayed at the Aichi Arts Center. The Aichi Arts Center also is the venue of rotating exhibitions. The city is also home to theNagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, a sister museum to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, which was founded to bring aspects of the MFA's collection to Japan.

The art of porcelain and ceramics can be seen at the Noritake Garden. Toyota has two museums in the city, the Toyota Automobile Museum which shows vintage cars, and the Toyota Commemorative Museum of Industry and Technology, which showcases company history, including its start as atextile mill.

The Nagoya City Tram & Subway Museum has trams and subway cars, as well as the Nagoya City Science Museum. The SCMaglev and Railway Park opened in March 2011 with various trains from the Central Japan Railway Company.

Other art museums in Aichi prefecture are the Aichi Prefectural Ceramic Museum and the Toyota Municipal Museum of Art. Meiji Mura is an open-air museum with salvaged buildings from the Meiji, Taisho and Showa eras.

Other museums in the city include the International Design Centre Nagoya, the Japan Spinning Top Museum and the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ Money Museum.


Theatres

Noh theatre and Kyōgen date back to the feudal times of the Owari Tokugawa. The Nagoya Noh Theater at Nagoya Castle continues that tradition and is a prominent feature in the cultural life of the city, with monthly performances.

One of Japan's Kabuki grand stages is Misono-za, which also hosts various other Japanese entertainment such as concerts.

In 1992, the large, modern Aichi Arts Center was opened in Sakae. It is the main venue for performing arts, featuring a main hall that can be used for opera and theatre and a concert hall. The Nagoya Philharmonic Orchestra performs there, as well as many visiting guest orchestras.


Festivals

Apart from the main national festivals and holidays, other festivals are unique to the city/region.

Major events include the June Atsuta Festival, the July Port Festival, the August Nagoya Castle Summer Festival Castle and the October Nagoya Festival. Wards and areas host local festivals such as the Daidō-chōnin Matsuri (大須大道町人祭 Street Performer's Festival?) in Ōsu.


Tourist Information

Nagoya Convention and Visitors BureauNagoya Chamber of Commerce & Industry Bldg. 11F, 2-10-19 Sakae, Naka-ku,  +81 52 202-1143 (Tourism Dept).Operates three tourist information centers across the city:

  • Nagoya Station Tourist Information1-1-4 Meieki, Nakamura-ku (JR Nagoya Station Central Concourse (towards Sakura-dori side)),  +81 52-541-4301fax:+81 52-571-1669. Daily 9AM-7PM. Closed Dec 29-Jan 1
  • Kanayama Tourist InformationLOOP Kanayama 1F, 1-17-18 Kanayama, Naka-ku (Located at the N exit of Kanayama Station.),  +81 52-323-0161fax:+81 52-323-0162. Daily 9AM-8PM. Closed Dec 29-Jan 1.
  • Sakae Tourist InformationOasis 21 B1F, 1-11-1, Higashisakura, Higashi-ku(By subway, get off at Sakae Station and take exit 4A. Located in Oasis 21 underground shopping concourse.),  +81 52-963-5252fax: +81-52-963-5262.Daily 10AM-8PM.

History

Now a modern metropolis, Nagoya gets its name from an old manor called Nagono which was built in the area in the 12th century. The manor prospered for two hundred years, and people began to refer to the area by the manor's name. Over time, the pronunciation of the Chinese characters in the name "Nagono" shifted to "Nagoya", by which the city is now known.

Three famous local figures later helped to put Nagoya firmly on the map of Japan. Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu all hailed from around Nagoya, and all shared the ambitious goal of unifying Japan under one government. Tokugawa finally succeeded in 1603 after winning in the Battle of Sekigahara, and established the Tokugawa Shogunate, which would rule Japan for the next 250 years.

Soon after uniting the country, Tokugawa Ieyasu ordered the construction of Nagoya Castle for his son. He then ordered the people of nearby Kiyosu (on the outskirts of Nagoya) to move to the area around the castle, and a town soon came into being. Cotton, ceramics and lumber were the main industries sustaining the town as it grew into a small city.

Following Japan's opening to the world during the Meiji era, Nagoya rapidly industrialized and established transportation links with the rest of Japan that would allow it to easily export its goods. During World War I, Nagoya became known for its foundries as well as its machinery and heavy industry exports, which would continue to grow throughout the 1930s.

The 1920s marked the beginnings of the automotive industry in Nagoya, which continues in importance to the current day. At the heart of the industry is the Toyota Motor Corporation. Starting from humble beginnings as a loom-making company, Toyota entered into the automobile business in the 1930s. It now stands as the world's largest automaker, and continues to dominate the local economy along with the car-making giants Honda and Mitsubishi.

During World War II, much of Nagoya's manufacturing infrastructure turned to the production of military goods, making it a prime target for bombing raids. Almost 25% of the city was destroyed during the war, with almost half the population fleeing to the countryside to avoid the attacks.

The end of the war marked a new start for Nagoya. Car-friendly wide streets and boulevards were bulldozed through the rubble of war, making for the city of today.

Nagoya now ranks as one of the nation's economic powerhouses, and is home to the head offices of Toyota Motor Corporation, Brother Industries, Daido Steel, Makita, Denso Corporation, INAX, Suzuki Motor, Honda Motor, Noritake, NGK Insulators, Olympus Optical, Yamaha and many others. Unlike other parts of Japan, which borrowed heavily for elaborate and expensive public works projects in the bubble years of the 1980s, ketchi(cheap) Nagoya held to a pay-as-you-go philosophy, and has not been as adversely affected by the post-bubble recession as other major centers.

The booming economy has also brought many foreigners to the area, and the region now hosts a thriving community of Japanese-descent Brazilian immigrants, who help to keep the wheels of the local economy spinning. With its strong economy and growing population, Nagoya is a city to watch in the coming years.

Climate

Nagoya's climate varies greatly throughout the year, with average temperatures ranging from a low of 4°C (39.2°F) in January to a high of 27°C (80.6°F) in August. The city is known for its incredibly hot and humid summers like many cities in Japan, with high temperatures routinely surpassing 30°C (86°F)in August, so those with an aversion to heat would be better off visiting in the milder temperatures of the spring or autumn.

Climate data for Nagoya

MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)21.0
(69.8)
22.6
(72.7)
25.8
(78.4)
30.5
(86.9)
34.8
(94.6)
35.8
(96.4)
38.9
(102)
39.9
(103.8)
38.0
(100.4)
32.7
(90.9)
27.2
(81)
21.3
(70.3)
39.9
(103.8)
Average high °C (°F)9.0
(48.2)
10.1
(50.2)
13.9
(57)
19.9
(67.8)
24.1
(75.4)
27.2
(81)
30.8
(87.4)
32.8
(91)
28.6
(83.5)
22.8
(73)
17.0
(62.6)
11.6
(52.9)
20.7
(69.3)
Daily mean °C (°F)4.5
(40.1)
5.2
(41.4)
8.7
(47.7)
14.4
(57.9)
18.9
(66)
22.7
(72.9)
26.4
(79.5)
27.8
(82)
24.1
(75.4)
18.1
(64.6)
12.2
(54)
7.0
(44.6)
15.8
(60.4)
Average low °C (°F)0.8
(33.4)
1.1
(34)
4.2
(39.6)
9.6
(49.3)
14.5
(58.1)
19.0
(66.2)
23.0
(73.4)
24.3
(75.7)
20.7
(69.3)
14.1
(57.4)
8.1
(46.6)
3.1
(37.6)
11.9
(53.4)
Record low °C (°F)−10.3
(13.5)
−9.5
(14.9)
−6.8
(19.8)
−2.1
(28.2)
2.8
(37)
8.2
(46.8)
14.0
(57.2)
14.4
(57.9)
9.5
(49.1)
1.5
(34.7)
−2.7
(27.1)
−7.2
(19)
−10.4
(13.3)
              

Geography

Nagoya lies north of Ise Bay on the Nōbi Plain. The city was built on low-level plateaus to ward off floodwaters. The plain is one of the nation's most fertile areas. The Kiso River flows to the west along the city border, and the Shōnai River comes from the northeast and turns south towards the bay at Nishi Ward. The man-made Hori River was constructed as a canal in 1610. It flows from north to south, as part of the Shōnai River system. The rivers allowed for trade with the hinterland. The Tempaku River feeds from a number of smaller river in the east, flows briefly south at Nonami and then west at Ōdaka into the bay.

The city's location and its position in the centre of Japan allowed it to develop economically and politically.

Economy

Nagoya is the center of Greater Nagoya, which earned nearly 70 percent of Japan's 2003 trade surplus.


Transportation

Nagoya's main industry is automotive. Toyota's luxury brand Lexus, Denso, Aisin Seiki Co.,Toyota Industries, JTEKT and Toyota Boshoku have their headquarters in or near Nagoya.Mitsubishi Motors has an R & D division in the suburb of Okazaki. Major component suppliers such as Magna International and PPG also have a strong presence here. S park plug maker NGK and Nippon Sharyo, known for manufacturing rolling stock including the Shinkansen are headquartered there.

The aviation history has historically been of importance since the industrialization. During the war the Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter was constructed in Nagoya. The aviation tradition continues with Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation headquartered in the Nagoya Airfield's terminal building in Komaki. The Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) aircraft is produced at a factory adjacent to the airport. The MRJ is a partnership between majority owner Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Toyota with design assistance from Toyota affiliate Fuji Heavy Industries, already a manufacturer of aircraft. It is the first airliner designed and produced in Japan since the NAMC YS-11 of the 1960s. The MRJ's first flight was on November 11, 2015.

JR Central, which operates Tōkaidō Shinkansen, has its headquarters in Nagoya, as does the regional Meitetsu railway company.


Technology

Mechanized puppets, called "karakuri ningyo", are a traditional craft from the area. Robot technology is another rapidly developing industry.

A materials engineering industry is developing.

Brother Industries, which is known for office electronics such as multifunction printers is based in Nagoya, as is Hoshizaki Electric, which is known for commercial ice machines and refrigeration equipment. Many small machine tool and electronics companies are also based in the area.

The World Expo 2005, also known as Aichi Expo was held near Nagoya in the neighboring cities of Nagakute and Seto from March 25 to September 25, 2005.


Retail

Retail is of importance in the city. Traditional department stores with roots in Nagoya are Matsuzakaya, Maruei and the Meitetsu Department Store.Oriental Nakamura was bought by Mitsukoshi from Tokyo in 1977.


Arts and Crafts

The ceramics company Noritake is based in Nagoya. The Owari province was historically well known for the cloisonné art form. The Ando Cloisonné Company continues the long tradition.


Other

Confectionery company Marukawa is well known.

The city offers venues for conferences and congresses led by the Nagoya Congress Center and the Nagoya International Exhibition Hall.

Subdivisions

Nagoya has 16 wards:

  • Atsuta-ku
  • Chikusa-ku
  • Higashi-ku
  • Kita-ku
  • Meitō-ku
  • Midori-ku
  • Minami-ku
  • Minato-ku
  • Mizuho-ku
  • Moriyama-ku
  • Naka-ku—administrative center
  • Nakagawa-ku
  • Nakamura-ku
  • Nishi-ku
  • Shōwa-ku
  • Tempaku-ku

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