KUALA LUMPUR

Introduction

Info Kuala Lumpur

introduction

Kuala Lumpur, simply called KL by locals, is the national capital and most populous global city in Malaysia.

Literally meaning muddy river confluence in Malay, Kuala Lumpur has grown from a small sleepy Chinese tin-mining village to a bustling metropolis of around 6.5 million (city-proper population of 1.8 million) in just 150 years.

Kuala Lumpur is cultural melting pot with some of the world's cheapest 5-star hotels, impressive shopping districts, even better food and some of nature's wonders just an hour away, making this a dynamic city with much to offer.

The city covers an area of 243 km2 (94 sq mi).  It is among the fastest growing metropolitan regions in South-East Asia, in terms of population and economy.

Kuala Lumpur is the seat of the Parliament of Malaysia. The city was once home to the executive and judicial branches of the federal government, but they were moved to Putrajaya in early 1999. Some sections of the judiciary still remain in the capital city of Kuala Lumpur. The official residence of the Malaysian King, the Istana Negara, is also situated in Kuala Lumpur.

Rated as an alpha world city, Kuala Lumpur is the cultural, financial and economic centre of Malaysia due to its position as the capital as well as being a key city.

Since the 1990s, the city has played host to many international sporting, political and cultural events including the 1998 Commonwealth Games and the Formula One Grand Prix. In addition, Kuala Lumpur is home to the tallest twin buildings in the world, the Petronas Twin Towers, which have become an iconic symbol of Malaysia's futuristic development.

In May 2015, Kuala Lumpur was officially recognized as one of the New7Wonders Cities together with Vigan City, Doha, Durban, Havana, Beirut, and La Paz.

info

POPULATION : City: 1,768,000 /  Metro: 7,200,000
FOUNDED :  1859
TIME ZONE : MST (UTC+8) Summer: (UTC+8)
LANGUAGE : Bahasa Malaysia (official), English, Chinese
RELIGION : Islam 46.4%, Buddhism 35.7%, Hinduisam 8.5%, Christian 5.8%, Others 3.6% 
AREA : 243 km2 (94 sq mi)
ELEVATION : 56 m (184 ft)
COORDINATES : 3°8′N 101°41′E
SEX RATIO : Male: 48.50%  
 Female: 51.50%
ETHNIC : Malays 45.9%, Chinese 43.2%, Indians, 10.3%, Other 1.6%
AREA CODE : 03
POSTAL CODE : 50000 to 60000
DIALING CODE : +60 3
WEBSITE : www.dbkl.gov.my

Tourism

Tourism plays an important role in the city's service-driven economy. Many large worldwide hotel chains have a presence in the city.

Kuala Lumpur is the sixth most visited city in the world, with 8.9 million tourist per year.

Tourism here is driven by the city's cultural diversity, relatively low costs, and wide gastronomic and shopping variety. MICE tourism, which mainly encompasses conventions— has expanded in recent years to become a vital component of the industry, and is expected to grow further once the Malaysian government's Economic Transformation Programme kicks in, and with the completion of a new 93,000m2-size MATRADE Centre in 2014. Another notable trend is the increased presence of budget hotels in the city.

The major tourist destinations in Kuala Lumpur include the Merdeka Square, the House of Parliament, the Petaling Street, the National Palace (Istana Negara), the Kuala Lumpur Tower, the National Museum, the Central Market, Kuala Lumpur City Gallery, the National Monument, and religious sites such as the Jamek Mosque.

Kuala Lumpur plays host to many cultural festivals such as the Thaipusam procession at the Sri Mahamariamman Temple. Every year during the Thaipusam celebration, a silver chariot carrying the statue of Lord Muruga together with his consort Valli and Teivayanni would be paraded through the city beginning at the temple all the way to Batu Caves in the neighboring Selangor.

The entertainment hub of the city is mainly centred in the Golden Triangle encompassing Jalan P. Ramlee, Jalan Sultan Ismail and Ampang Road. Trendy nightclubs, bars and lounges, such as the Beach Club, Espanda, the Hakka Republic Wine Bar & Restaurant, Hard Rock Cafe, the Luna Bar, Nuovo, Rum Jungle, the Thai Club, Zouk, and many others are located here.

History

Founded in 1857 under British rule as a tin mining outpost, Kuala Lumpur is fairly new as far as Malaysian cities go and lacks the rich history of Georgetown or Malacca. Due to the success of tin mining, Kuala Lumpur began to flourish but had problems with gang fighting in the late 1800s. Following this, Kuala Lumpur faced further misfortune after much of the city burnt down in a large fire as most buildings were built from wood and thatch. As a result buildings in Kuala Lumpur were required to be built with brick and tile. After these rough early years, Kuala Lumpur began to prosper and was made capital of the Federated Malay States in 1896.

During World War II, Kuala Lumpur and the Federated Malay States were occupied by the Japanese from 1942 to 1945. During this time the economy was virtually halted. Soon after the British regained power it was declared that the Federated Malay States were to become the Malayan Union and work toward independence began. In 1952, Kuala Lumpur was one of the first cities in the Union to hold elections. Malaysia's independence was declared in 1957 in front of huge crowds at what was later named Stadium Merdeka (Independence Stadium), and Kuala Lumpur continued as the new nation's capital.

In 1972, Kuala Lumpur was given city status and by 1974 became a Federal Territory of Malaysia in its own right, hence losing the title as capital city of Selangor. The economic boom of the 1990s brought Kuala Lumpur the standard trappings of a modern city, but it was severely hit by the Asian financial crisis of 1997, which stalled the Malaysian economy and led to the abandonment or delay of many construction projects. Today, Kuala Lumpur has become a modern city, bristling with skyscrapers and with a modern transportation system. Despite this, Kuala Lumpur has still kept some of its historical charm. 

Climate

Protected by the Titiwangsa Mountains in the east and Indonesia's Sumatra Island in the west, Kuala Lumpur has a tropical rainforest climate, which is warm and sunny, along with abundant rainfall, especially during the northeast monsoon season from October to March.

Temperatures tend to remain constant. Maximums hover between 32 and 33 °C (90 and 91 °F) and have never exceeded 38.5 °C (101.3 °F), while minimums hover between 23.4 and 24.6 °C (74.1 and 76.3 °F) and have never fallen below 14.4 °C (57.9 °F).

Temperatures tend to remain constant. Maximums hover between 32 and 33 °C (90 and 91 °F) and have never exceeded 38.5 °C (101.3 °F), while minimums hover between 23.4 and 24.6 °C (74.1 and 76.3 °F) and have never fallen below 14.4 °C (57.9 °F).

Flooding is a frequent occurrence in Kuala Lumpur whenever there is a heavy downpour, especially in the city centre and downstream areas. Smoke from forest fires of nearby Sumatra sometimes cast a haze over the region. It is a major source of pollution in the city together with open burning, emission from motor vehicles and construction work.

Climate data for Kuala Lumpur

MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)38.0
(100.4)
36.2
(97.2)
36.7
(98.1)
37.2
(99)
38.5
(101.3)
36.6
(97.9)
36.3
(97.3)
38.0
(100.4)
35.8
(96.4)
37.0
(98.6)
36.0
(96.8)
35.5
(95.9)
38.5
(101.3)
Average high °C (°F)32.0
(89.6)
32.8
(91)
33.1
(91.6)
33.1
(91.6)
33.0
(91.4)
32.8
(91)
32.8
(91)
32.3
(90.1)
32.1
(89.8)
32.0
(89.6)
31.7
(89.1)
31.5
(88.7)
32.4
(90.3)
Daily mean °C (°F)27.7
(81.9)
28.2
(82.8)
28.6
(83.5)
28.7
(83.7)
28.8
(83.8)
28.6
(83.5)
28.1
(82.6)
28.1
(82.6)
28.0
(82.4)
28.0
(82.4)
27.8
(82)
27.6
(81.7)
28.2
(82.8)
Average low °C (°F)23.4
(74.1)
23.6
(74.5)
24.0
(75.2)
24.3
(75.7)
24.6
(76.3)
24.3
(75.7)
23.8
(74.8)
23.9
(75)
23.8
(74.8)
24.0
(75.2)
23.8
(74.8)
23.6
(74.5)
23.9
(75)
Record low °C (°F)17.8
(64)
18.0
(64.4)
18.9
(66)
20.6
(69.1)
20.5
(68.9)
19.1
(66.4)
20.1
(68.2)
20.0
(68)
21.0
(69.8)
20.0
(68)
20.7
(69.3)
19.0
(66.2)
17.8
(64)
              
Source #1: Pogodaiklimat.ru
Source #2: NOAA 

Geography

The geography of Kuala Lumpur is characterised by the huge Klang Valley. The valley is bordered by the Titiwangsa Mountains in the east, several minor ranges in the north and the south and the Strait of Malacca in the west. Kuala Lumpur is a Malay term that translates to "muddy confluence" as it is located at the confluence of the Klang and Gombak rivers.

Located in the centre of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur was previously under the rule of Selangor State Government. In 1974, Kuala Lumpur was separated from Selangor to form the first Federal Territory governed directly by the Malaysian Federal Government. Its location on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia, which has wider flat land than the east coast, has contributed to its faster development relative to other cities in Malaysia.

Economy

Kuala Lumpur and its surrounding urban areas form the most industrialised and economically, the fastest growing region in Malaysia.Despite the relocation of federal government administration to Putrajaya, certain government institutions such as Bank Negara Malaysia (National Bank of Malaysia), Companies Commission of Malaysia and Securities Commission as well as most embassies and diplomatic missions have remained in the city.

The city remains as the economic and business centre of the country. Kuala Lumpur is a centre for finance, insurance, real estate, media and the arts of Malaysia. Kuala Lumpur is rated as an alpha world city, and is the only global city in Malaysia, according to the Globalization and World Cities Study Group and Network (GaWC).

The infrastructure development in the surrounding areas such as the Kuala Lumpur International Airport at Sepang, the creation of the Multimedia Super Corridor and the expansion of Port Klang further reinforce the economic significance of the city.

The large service sector is evident in the number of local and foreign banks and insurance companies operating in the city. Kuala Lumpur is poised to become the global Islamic Financing hub with an increasing number of financial institutions providing Islamic Financing and the strong presence of Gulf's financial institutions such as the world's largest Islamic bank, Al-Rajhi Bank and Kuwait Finance House.

Other important economic activities in the city are education and health services. Kuala Lumpur also has advantages stemming from the high concentration of educational institutions that provide a wide-ranging of courses. Numerous public and private medical specialist centres and hospitals in the city offer general health services, and a wide range of specialist surgery and treatment that caters to locals and tourists.

Subdivisions

Old City Centre
This is the traditional core of Kuala Lumpur where you’ll find the former colonial administrative centre, with the Merdeka Square, Sultan Abdul Samad Building and Selangor Club. This district also includes Kuala Lumpur’s old Chinese commercial centre which everyone refers to now as Chinatown.

Golden Triangle
Kuala Lumpur's equivalent of a Central Business District (CBD) located to the north-east of the Old City Centre. The area is brimming to the seams with shopping malls, bars and five-star hotels, along with the iconic Petronas Twin Towers.

Tuanku Abdul Rahman, Chow Kit and Kampung Baru
Located to the west of the Golden Triangle and an extension of the Old City Centre. Home to modern shopping malls, traditional street markets and budget accommodation options. Kampung Baru, the last Malay village of Kuala Lumpur, is a food paradise of street stalls and restaurants in traditional kampung setting.

Brickfields
This area, located south of the city centre, is Kuala Lumpur’s Little India filled with saree shops and banana leaf rice restaurants. Kuala Lumpur’s main railway station, KL Sentral, is located here.

Bangsar and Midvalley
Located south of the city, Bangsar is a popular restaurant and clubbing district while Mid Valley, with its Megamall, is one of the city’s most popular shopping destinations.

Damansara and Hartamas
Largely suburban, these two districts to the west of the city house some interesting pockets of restaurants and drinking areas. This district also merges into the northern part of Petaling Jaya.

Ampang
Located east of the city, Ampang is home to Kuala Lumpur’s Little Korea and most foreign embassies and high commissions.

Northern suburbs
This huge area to the north of the city is home to several natural wonders attractions, such as the Batu Caves, the National Zoo and the Forest Research Institute of Malaysia.

Southern suburbs
This district may not interest travellers much, although Kuala Lumpur’s National Stadium and National Sports Complex Bukit Jalil are located here.


Internet, Comunication

Internet cafes are quite plentiful in Kuala Lumpur and you can find them in most shopping centres. If you have your own laptop, Maxis' WLAN service is the best deal around, a prepaid 4$ card gets you unlimited use for 2 weeks. Many hotels provide free internet access and connections. Free Wi-Fi is also available in many cafes, restaurants and shopping centres.

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