FUJAIRAH

United Arab Emirates

Fujairah (Arabic: الفجيرة‎‎ Al Fuǧaira) is one of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates, and the only one of the seven that has a coastline solely on the Gulf of Oman and none on the Persian Gulf.

Info Fujairah

introduction

Fujairah (Arabic: الفجيرة‎‎ Al Fuǧaira) is one of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates, and the only one of the seven that has a coastline solely on the Gulf of Oman and none on the Persian Gulf.

info
POPULATION : 152,000
FOUNDED : 
TIME ZONE : UAE standard time (UTC+4)
LANGUAGE : Arabic (official)
RELIGION : Islam
AREA : 1,166 km2 (450 sq mi)
ELEVATION :
COORDINATES : 25°16′N 56°20′E
SEX RATIO : Male: 70.1%
 Female: 29.9%
ETHNIC :
AREA CODE :
POSTAL CODE :
DIALING CODE :
WEBSITE :

Tourism

The UAE culture mainly revolves around the religion of Islam and traditional Arab culture. The influence of Islamic and Arab culture on its architecture, music, attire, cuisine and lifestyle are very prominent as well. Five times every day, Muslims are called to prayer from the minarets of mosques which are scattered around the country. Since 2006, the weekend has been Friday-Saturday, as a compromise between Friday's holiness to Muslims and the Western weekend of Saturday-Sunday.

Drinking alcohol is allowed at designated hotels, and as of 2000, at a few bars. Until 1998, gambling in the form of slot machines was allowed in certain hotels, but personal petitions by locals to the Sheikh outlawed the activity. Some players were losing entire monthly wages on the slots, leaving nothing for the upkeep of their families.

Groups of (Emirati) youths tend to socialize together on the streets and cafés or outside games arcades, cinemas and mini malls. It is unusual to see mixed-sex groups as Emirati society is quite segregated.

On vacations, many Fujairah residents travel to western emirates such as Dubai and Abu Dhabi, for entertainment and shopping purposes. They also visit the Wadis surrounding the emirate on camping and hiking trips. At the same time, other emirates' residents visit Fujairah for relaxation purposes and to get away from the stifling heat of the desert. Watersports are becoming more and more popular amongst both locals and tourists. Examples of watersports are jet skis, windsurfing, waterskiing and diving. Professional diving instructors can be found in Le Meridien or in Royal Beach Hotel, where one can even obtain an International Diving License, for a fee.

History

Fujairah, dominated by theSharqiyin tribe, sits at the mouth of the important trade route, the Wadi Ham (which is guarded by the Sharqiyin fort at Bithnah), through the mountains to the interior and the Persian Gulf Coast. Known as theShamaliyah, the east coast of what is now the UAE was subject to Muscat until 1850, when it was annexed by the Al Qasimi of Sharjah.

The Shamaliyah was governed by the Al Qasimi Wali at Kalba although frequently seceded and in 1901 Hamad bin Abdulla Al Sharqi, chief of the Sharqiyin, declared independence from Sharjah. This was recognised by a number of the Trucial Sheikhs and also by Muscat, but not the British, who were frequently provoked by the independently-minded Ruler.

In 1952, Fujairah entered into treaty relations with Britain, becoming the last of the emirates to join the Trucial States. On 2 December 1971, Fujairah joined the United Arab Emirates.

Fujairah is home to the oldest mosque in the United Arab Emirates which was built in 1446 of mud and bricks. It is similar to other mosques found in Yemen, eastern Oman, and Qatar. Al Bidyah Mosque has four domes (unlike the other similar mosques which have between seven and twelve) and lacks a minaret.

Climate

The weather is seasonal, although it is warm most of the year. The months of October to March are generally regarded as the coolest, with daytime temperatures averaging around 25 °C (77 °F) and rarely venturing above 30 °C (86 °F)—with temperatures climbing to over 40 °C (104 °F) degrees in the summer. The winter period also coincides with the rainy season and although by no means guaranteed, this is when Fujairah experiences the bulk of its precipitation. Rainfall is higher than the rest of the UAE, partly because of the effect of the mountains that encircle the Emirate, and partly because the prevailing winds are easterly bringing with them water-laden clouds off the warm Indian Ocean.

Climate data for Fujairah

MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)30
(86)
32
(90)
37
(99)
42
(108)
45
(113)
46
(115)
47
(117)
47
(117)
44
(111)
41
(106)
36
(97)
30
(86)
48
(118)
Average high °C (°F)23
(73)
25
(77)
28
(82)
33
(91)
37.2
(99)
38.4
(101.1)
38.7
(101.7)
37.8
(100)
36
(97)
34
(93)
30
(86)
26
(79)
32.26
(89.98)
Average low °C (°F)12
(54)
13
(55)
16
(61)
19
(66)
23
(73)
26
(79)
28.6
(83.5)
28.2
(82.8)
25
(77)
21
(70)
16
(61)
14
(57)
20.15
(68.27)
Record low °C (°F)5
(41)
6
(43)
7
(45)
9
(48)
12
(54)
15
(59)
18
(64)
21
(70)
23
(73)
18
(64)
12
(54)
7
(45)
5
(41)

Geography

The emirate of Fujairah covers approximately 1,166 km2, or about 1.5% of the area of the UAE, and is the fifth-largest emirate in the UAE. Its population is around 152,000 inhabitants (in 2009); only the Emirate of Umm al-Quwain has fewer occupants.

Fujairah is the only emirate of the UAE that is almost completely mountainous. All the other emirates, such as Dubai and Abu Dhabi are located on the west coast, and are largely covered by deserts. Consequently, Fujairah boasts a higher than average yearly rainfall of the UAE, allowing farmers in the region to produce one crop every year. The emirate has a cove, Ad Dayt.

Economy

Fujairah's economy is based on subsidies and federal government grants distributed by the government of Abu Dhabi (the seat of power in the UAE). Local industries consist of cement, stone crushing and mining. A resurgence in the construction activity helped the local industry. There is a flourishing free trade zone, mimicking the success of the Dubai Free Zone Authority which was established around Jebel Ali Port.

The federal government employs the majority of the native, local workforce, with few opening businesses of their own. Many of the locals work in the service sector. The Fujairah government prohibits foreigners from owning more than 49% of any business. The free zones have flourished, partly due to the relaxation of such prohibition within the zones, as full foreign ownership is allowed there. Shaikh Saleh Al Sharqi, younger brother to the ruler, is widely recognized as the driving force behind the commercialization of the economy.

Fujairah is a minor bunkering port with large scale shipping operations taking place every day. Shipping and ship related services are thriving businesses of the city. Due to the business friendly environment and ease of logistic support, ships trading from Persian gulf anchor here for provisions, bunkers, repair and technical support, spares and stores before proceeding on long voyages. The city is also geographically well suited for such ship service related activities.

Government of Fujairah is major shareholder in National Bank of Fujairah, an UAE local bank, incorporated in 1982. NBF is in the areas of corporate and commercial banking, trade finance and treasury.


Land

Foreigners or visitors are not allowed to buy land. Emirati nationals can purchase land from the government, after proving their nationality. If there is no suitable land available via the official government offices, private purchases can also be made, with the eventual price being determined by the market and the individuals themselves.

Prices in Fujairah

PRICES LIST - USD

MARKET / SUPERMARKET

Milk1 liter$1.52
Tomatoes1 kg$1.37
Cheese0.5 kg$4.00
Apples1 kg$2.30
Oranges1 kg$1.75
Beer (domestic)0.5 l$
Bottle of Wine1 bottle$
Coca-Cola2 liters$1.76
Bread1 piece$1.10
Water1.5 l$0.60

PRICES LIST - USD

RESTAURANTS

Dinner (Low-range)for 2$
Dinner (Mid-range)for 2$28.00
Dinner (High-range)for 2$
Mac Meal or similar1 meal$
Water0.33 l$0.33
Cappuccino1 cup$3.50
Beer (Imported)0.33 l$
Beer (domestic)0.5 l$
Coca-Cola0.33 l$0.45
Coctail drink1 drink$

PRICES LIST - USD

ENTERTAINMENT

Cinema2 tickets$19.00
Gym1 month$50.00
Men’s Haircut1 haircut$4.10
Theatar2 tickets$25.00
Mobile (prepaid)1 min.$0.27
Pack of Marlboro1 pack$2.80

PRICES LIST - USD

PERSONAL CARE

Antibiotics1 pack$
Tampons32 pieces$
Deodorant50 ml.$8.00
Shampoo400 ml.$8.50
Toilet paper4 rolls$
Toothpaste1 tube$7.00

PRICES LIST - USD

CLOTHES / SHOES

Jeans (Levis 501 or similar)1$68.00
Dress summer (Zara, H&M)1$50.00
Sport shoes (Nike, Adidas)1$90.00
Leather shoes1$78.00

PRICES LIST - USD

TRANSPORTATION

Gasoline1 liter$0.47
TaxiStart$0.90
Taxi1 km$0.60
Local Transport1 ticket$

Transportation - Get In

Transportation - Get In

By plane

While Fujairah has an airport, it is closed to passenger aviation at the present time. Airborne visitors will arrive at one of the western Emirates.

Transportation - Get In

By Train

Trains only operate in Dubai.

Transportation - Get In

By Bus

Buses run regularly between Dubai and Fujairah (around one every hour during the day and evening); the cost is 25 Dhs one way (tickets to be bought from the ticket window before boarding).

The bus service is comfortable. Women and couples/families sit in the front two to three rows and males in the remaining seats.

Buses leave from Union Square in Dubai, and from the old Plaza Cinema/HSBC in Fujairah (stopping at the bus station on the way out of town, where passengers need to disembark to buy their tickets before re-boarding).

Transportation - Get In

By Car

Fujairah is roughly 2 hours by car from Dubai and the trip is on sealed roads throughout.

It is also quite easy to reach Fujairah from nearby Oman, as the border is very close.

Note: Fujairah is in UAE, which is separate from Oman (two countries), although they belong to the group known as GCC Countries. Visitors must have separate visas for Oman and UAE in order to move from one to the other by car or any other mode of travelling.

Transportation - Get In

By taxi

Taxis run from Fujairah (next to the old cinema) to Dubai and Sharjah. A shared taxi to downtown Dubai (Deira taxi stand) costs around $7 and they go as soon as the car is full. An unshared one costs about $28 but it depends on where you want to go in Dubai. Add another $15 if you want to go the Marina area where all the tourist hotels are. Beware - metered taxis from Dubai to Fujairah are twice the price.


Transportation - Get Around

Fujairah city itself is most emphatically not designed for pedestrians, being dominated by main roads. Thankfully, taxis, which have been completely changed to a new fleet of Nissan Altimas and Toyota Camrys, are metered,and start at 2 dirhims during the day (2.50 at night.) are plentiful. In fact, visitors attempting to walk around the city will attract horn tooting from taxi drivers, who seriously cannot believe that anyone would choose to walk.

Hotels

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Hotels

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Shopping

The local souk tends to sell products for residents (plants, spices etc.) rather than tourist merchandise. A smaller souk is open along the Corniche in the evenings, but the main focus there is on generic goods - and copies of brand-name items.

For souvenirs, most top-level hotels have at least one gift shop with the customary array of items. Prices are not negotiable and tend to the higher end of the spectrum.

Restaurants


Budget

Gulf Flower Bakery sells good falafel sandwiches and other bits and pieces.


Mid-range

The al-Meshwar restaurant is located in the centre of the city in a whimsical-looking building and features a ground-floor "cafe" serving the regional staples (shawarma, felafel etc.) and shishas. Above that is the main restaurant, which serves good-quality Lebanese fare.

A franchise of the Persian restaurant chain Sadaf is also to be found in the city. The decor is rather startling (including a waterfall in the middle of the dining room), but the food is of a good standard.

Coffe & Drink

There are no local specialties as far as drink goes, which means that the usual collection of water, juices, tea, coffee and softdrinks are readily available.

Alcohol is mostly only available within top-quality hotels. Cheaper alternatives include the Fujairah Marine Club on the corniche and Fujairah Beach Motel, which also has a retail "hole-in-the-wall." You'll have to ask as it's hidden away a bit.

The best value drinks in town are to be had in the pub at the Tennis and Country Club (go on a Tuesday and you get karaoke too).

Sights & Landmarks

Despite its location, there is very little to see in Fujairah city. The city is a business centre first and foremost, with none of the enticing atmosphere of the other large cities of the UAE.

Of some interest is the fort, located just outside the city itself. The main structure is still undergoing renovations, but visitors may walk around the reasonably large site (for free). Compared to other forts in the UAE, though, Fujairah Fort is a poor cousin; however there is a museum too (closed on Fridays) and the reconstruction of the heritage village is well on its way.

Things to do

While the Indian Ocean is enticingly close, some parts of the beach would not seem to be a good option to swim at. However, Dibba Al-Fujairah which is 30km far from Fujairah city would be a good choice, where you can enjoy the sunny beaches and you can practice any sea activity you like. One more interesting thing to do is that you can make a boat trip to one of many islands that lie in the Gulf of Oman, a really wonderful places to visit and it is a good place for fishing.

All things considered, Fujairah is probably more suited as a base from which to go on excursions to the surrounding areas (most of which are enclaves of Sharjah), rather than doing anything much else. The city is growing in stature as a business destination, particularly where oil is concerned, but tourism remains somehow significantly behind.

Things to know


Daily life

The UAE culture mainly revolves around the religion of Islam and traditional Arab culture. The influence of Islamic and Arab culture on its architecture, music, attire, cuisine and lifestyle are very prominent as well. Five times every day, Muslims are called to prayer from the minarets of mosques which are scattered around the country. Since 2006, the weekend has been Friday-Saturday, as a compromise between Friday's holiness to Muslims and the Western weekend of Saturday-Sunday.

Drinking alcohol is allowed at designated hotels, and as of 2000, at a few bars. Until 1998, gambling in the form of slot machines was allowed in certain hotels, but personal petitions by locals to the Sheikh outlawed the activity. Some players were losing entire monthly wages on the slots, leaving nothing for the upkeep of their families.

Groups of (Emirati) youths tend to socialize together on the streets and cafés or outside games arcades, cinemas and mini malls. It is unusual to see mixed-sex groups as Emirati society is quite segregated.

On vacations, many Fujairah residents travel to western emirates such as Dubai and Abu Dhabi, for entertainment and shopping purposes. They also visit the Wadis surrounding the emirate on camping and hiking trips. At the same time, other emirates' residents visit Fujairah for relaxation purposes and to get away from the stifling heat of the desert. Watersports are becoming more and more popular amongst both locals and tourists. Examples of watersports are jet skis,windsurfing, waterskiing and diving. Professional diving instructors can be found in Le Meridien or in Royal Beach Hotel, where one can even obtain an International Diving License, for a fee.


Travel

Travel in and around Fujairah and the surrounding towns of Khor Fakkan, Kalba and Masafi has been made easy by the development of modern highways since independence in 1971. Highways are funded by the federal government directly, and contracts are tendered centrally. This is meant to safeguard the quality and delivery of the contracts and prevent corruption from damaging the construction.

Fujairah has a very limited public transport, with a single bus service operating within the emirate and a service operating to Dubai. Aside from private transport, there are a number of taxis operated by the government-owned Fujairah Transport Corporation (FTC.

The new Sheikh Khalifa highway linking Dubai and Fujairah was officially inaugurated on Saturday, December 4, 2011, following delays to the originally scheduled opening date of July 2011. It is a road that shortens distance by 20 to 30 km. The Fujairah International Airport is near the city, with a large falcon statue at the airport roundabout. However, currently it only offers commercial service toAbu Dhabi, a domestic destination within the UAE.

Safety in Fujairah

Stay Safe

The customary cautions regarding drivers in the UAE apply in Fujairah as well. Road rules are understood to exist, but drivers will tend to take risks which would seem borderline-suicidal to many visitors. Additionally, bear in mind that most roads are multi-lane in each direction in the city, which may well mean that a taxi or one's own car is the best bet here.Additionally, where the trip meter is either not present or "not working", agree on the fare before starting the trip.

Very High / 8.5

Safety (Walking alone - day)

Mid. / 5.8

Safety (Walking alone - night)

United Arab Emirates - Travel guide

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