DA NANG

Introduction

DA NANG WEATHER

Info Da Nang

introduction

Da Nang (Đà Nẵng) is Vietnam's fourth or fifth largest city, and is on the South China Sea coast, midway betweenHanoi and Ho Chi Minh City and the largest city of Central Vietnam.

The city itself has neither the ambiance of Hanoi nor the hustle-bustle of Ho Chi Minh City, but has its share of sights and is close to the charms of Hoi An and the imperial capital of Hue, making it a popular vacation spot for those looking to explore the attractions of central Vietnam or soak up some sun while hanging out on the city's beaches.

info
POPULATION : 1,007,400
FOUNDED : 
TIME ZONE : Indochina Time (UTC+07:00)
LANGUAGE : Vietnamese (official), English (increasingly favored as a second language), some French, Chinese, and Khmer; mountain area languages (Mon-Khmer and Malayo-Polynesian)
RELIGION : Buddhist 9.3%, Catholic 6.7%, Hoa Hao 1.5%, Cao Dai 1.1%, Protestant 0.5%, Muslim 0.1%, none 80.8%
AREA : 1,285.4 km2 (496.3 sq mi)
ELEVATION :
COORDINATES : 16°04′N 108°14′E
SEX RATIO : Male: 49.40%
 Female: 50,60%
ETHNIC : Kinh (Viet) 85.7%, Tay 1.9%, Thai 1.8%, Muong 1.5%, Khmer 1.5%, Mong 1.2%, Nung 1.1%, others 5.3%
AREA CODE : 511
POSTAL CODE :
DIALING CODE :
WEBSITE : http://www.danang.gov.vn/

Tourism

The tourism sector is a vital component of Da Nang's economy. Its status as a transportation hub for Central Vietnam and its proximity to several UNESCOWorld Heritage Sites, including the Imperial City of Huế, the Old Town of Hội An, and the Mỹ Sơn ruins fuels much of its tourist activity.

Mỹ Sơn is an archaeological site dating back more than a thousand years, in Quảng Nam. Located in a remote forested valley some 70 km west of Đà Nẵng, this former capital and religious center of the Champa kingdom once contained in excess of 70 style temples and stupas. Although badly damaged by bombing raids in the 1960s, the site still has more than 20 structures and was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999. Many statues, sculptures and reliefs recovered from Mỹ Sơn are kept in the Museum of Cham Sculpture, near the Hàn River in the heart of Đà Nẵng. Dating from the fourth to the 14th centuries, the sensual artwork on these works depicts daily activities as well as Hindu and Buddhist religious themes.

The Marble Mountains are rocky limestone outcrops jutting out of the beach just south of Đà Nẵng. Paths lead to the top of the forested cliffs, affording spectacular views of Non Nuoc Beach and the South China Sea. The caves nestled in the cliffs were originally inhabited by the Cham people. Later, the Nguyễn Dynasty built numerous pagodas among the caves. The Marble Mountains are home to various artisans producing sculpture and artwork at its base at Non Nước Village. Non Nuoc Beach is a white sandy beach on the outskirts of Đà Nẵng is renowned for both its spectacular beauty and for its history as an R&R destination for American troops during the Vietnam War, when it was known as "China Beach". Today, the beach, along with My Khê beach to the north, are home to expensive resorts, surfing and entertainment facilities.Bà Nà Hills is a mountain resort with a 5 km-long cable car system which carries guests up to Bà Nà's peak at 1487m above sea level. Sơn Trà Mountain, just some miles away from downtown with some wild streams and resorts along the seaside.

History

The city's origins date back to the ancient kingdom of Champa, established in 192 AD. At its peak, the Chams' sphere of influence stretched from Huếto Vũng Tàu. The city of Indrapura, at the site of the modern village of Dong Duong in Quảng Nam Province (about 50 km (31 mi) from Da Nang), was the capital of Champa from about 875 to about 1000 AD. Also in the region of Da Nang were the ancient Cham city of Singhapura ("City of the Lion"), the location of which has been identified with an archeological site in the modern village of Trà Kiệu, and the valley of Mỹ Sơn, where a number of ruined temples and towers can still be viewed.

In the latter half of the 10th century, the kings of Indrapura came into conflict with the Đại Việt, who were then based at Hoa Lư near modern Hanoi. In 982, three ambassadors sent to Champa by King Lê Hoàn of the Đại Việt (founder of the Early Lê Dynasty) were detained in Indrapura. Lê Hoàn decided to go on the offensive, sacking Indrapura and killing the Cham King Parameshvaravarman I. As a result of these setbacks, the Cham eventually abandoned Indrapura around 1000 AD. The Đại Việt campaign against Champa continued into the late 11th century, when the Cham were forced to cede their three northern provinces to the rulers of the Lý Dynasty. Soon afterwards, Vietnamese peasants began moving into the untilled former Cham lands, turning them into rice fields and moving relentlessly southward, delta by delta, along the narrow coastal plain. The southward expansion of Đại Việt (known as Nam Tiến) continued for several centuries, culminating in the annexation of most of the Cham territories by the end of the 15th century.


Western contact

One of the first Europeans to visit Đà Nẵng was Portuguese explorer António de Faria, who anchored in Đà Nẵng in 1535. Faria was one of the first Westerners to write about the area and, through his influence, Portuguese ships began to call regularly at Hội An, which was then a much more important port than Đà Nẵng. Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, French and Spanish traders and missionaries regularly made landfall at Hội An, just south of Đà Nẵng. An American, John White, arrived at Da Nang (then called Turon) on 18 June 1819 in the brig Franklin of Salem, Massachusetts, and was advised that the country was recovering from devastating wars, and that what little produce there had already been promised. Other American ships arriving shortly after were the Marmion of Boston, and the Aurora and Beverly of Salem. Conditions were such that they were unable to conduct trade, and the subsequent missions of British East India Company agent John Crawfurd in 1823 and the two missions of Andrew Jackson's agent, diplomatist Edmund Roberts, in 1833 and 1836 were unable to secure trade agreements.[13]:pp.19–40 Following the edict of Emperor Minh Mạng in 1835, prohibiting European vessels from making landfall or pursuing trade except at Hàn Port, Đà Nẵng quickly surpassed Hội An, becoming the largest commercial port in the central region.

In 1847, French vessels dispatched by Admiral Cécille bombarded Đà Nẵng, ostensibly on the grounds of alleged persecution of Roman Catholic missionaries. In August 1858, once again ostensibly on the grounds of religious persecution, French troops, led by Admiral Charles Rigault de Genouilly, and under the orders of Napoleon III, landed in Đà Nẵng as part of the punitive Cochinchina Campaign. The French overpowered the Vietnamese stationed in Đà Nẵng, swiftly occupying the city and Tiên Sa peninsula (present-day Sơn Trà peninsula). Despite their initial success, the occupying forces were quickly placed under siege by the Vietnamese army under the command of Nguyễn Tri Phương, and were eventually forced to retreat in March 1860. Conversely, however, the French were able to invade the southern stronghold of Saigonand, in June 1862, several provinces of southern Vietnam were ceded to the French as Cochinchina with the signing of the Treaty of Saigon.

Through two more decades of conflict, the French gradually strengthened their hold on Vietnam, culminating in the establishment of French Indochina(French: Union de l'Indochine Française) in October 1887. Two years later, in 1889, the French colonists renamed the city Tourane, placing it under the control of the Governor General of Indochina.  It came to be considered one of Indochina's five major cities, among Hanoi, Saigon–Cholon, Hải Phòng, and Huế.


Republic of Vietnam

During the Republic of Vietnam, the city was home to a major air base that was used by both the South Vietnamese and United States air forces in the War in Vietnam. The base was considered one of the world's busiest airports during the war, reaching an average of 2,595 air traffic operations daily, more than any airport in the world at that time. The final U.S. ground combat operations in Vietnam ceased on 13 August 1972, when a residual force of the 196th Light Infantry Brigade stood down in Đà Nẵng. B Battery 3rd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment fired the final U.S. artillery round and the 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment finished their final patrols. This residual force was known as "Operation Gimlet". After the US-withdrawal from the conflict, in the final stage of the conquering of South Vietnam by North Vietnam, Da Nang fell to the communist forces March 29/30, 1975. The posts of the Vietnam issued two special postage stamps to commemorate this event, within its "total liberation" stamp set issued Dec. 14, 1976.

Climate

Đà Nẵng has a tropical monsoon climate with two seasons: a typhoon & wet season lasting from September through March and a dry season lasting from April through August. Temperatures are typically high, with an annual average of 25.9 °C (78.6 °F). Temperatures are highest between June and August (with daily highs averaging 33 to 34 °C (91 to 93 °F)), and lowest between December and February (highs averaging 24 to 25 °C (75 to 77 °F)). The annual average for humidity is 81%, with highs between October and December (reaching 84%) and lows between June and July (reaching 76–77%).

On average, Đà Nẵng receives 2,505 mm (98.6 in) of rainfall. Rainfall is typically highest between October and November (ranging from 550 to 1,000 mm (22 to 39 in)) and lowest between January and April (ranging from 23 to 40 mm (0.91 to 1.57 in)). Đà Nẵng receives an average of 2156 hours of sunlight annually, with highs between 234 and 277 hours per month in May and June and lows between 69 and 165 hours per month in November and December.

Climate data for Da Nang

MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)32.8
(91)
36.8
(98.2)
37.2
(99)
41.1
(106)
39.4
(102.9)
40.0
(104)
38.3
(100.9)
39.0
(102.2)
37.8
(100)
36.1
(97)
35.0
(95)
32.8
(91)
41.1
(106)
Average high °C (°F)24.8
(76.6)
26.1
(79)
28.7
(83.7)
31.0
(87.8)
33.4
(92.1)
33.9
(93)
34.3
(93.7)
33.9
(93)
31.5
(88.7)
29.6
(85.3)
27.0
(80.6)
24.9
(76.8)
29.9
(85.8)
Daily mean °C (°F)21.7
(71.1)
23.0
(73.4)
25.1
(77.2)
27.2
(81)
29.2
(84.6)
29.7
(85.5)
29.8
(85.6)
29.7
(85.5)
27.8
(82)
26.4
(79.5)
24.3
(75.7)
22.1
(71.8)
26.3
(79.3)
Average low °C (°F)18.5
(65.3)
19.8
(67.6)
21.5
(70.7)
23.3
(73.9)
24.9
(76.8)
25.5
(77.9)
25.3
(77.5)
25.5
(77.9)
24.1
(75.4)
23.2
(73.8)
21.6
(70.9)
19.3
(66.7)
22.7
(72.9)
Record low °C (°F)8.9
(48)
7.8
(46)
11.1
(52)
7.8
(46)
18.9
(66)
20.0
(68)
17.8
(64)
21.4
(70.5)
20.9
(69.6)
12.2
(54)
7.2
(45)
11.1
(52)
7.2
(45)
              
Source #1: World Meteorological Organisation (UN)
Source #2: Deutscher Wetterdienst

Geography

Đà Nẵng is the largest city in central Vietnam and one of the country's most important ports. Ringed by mountains on one side and the South China Sea on the other, Đà Nẵng borders Thừa Thiên–Huế Province across theHải Vân Pass to the north, Quảng Nam Province to the south and west, and the ocean to the east. It is 759 km (472 mi) south of Hanoi, and 960 km (600 mi) north of Hồ Chí Minh City.


Geology and topography

Geologically, Đà Nẵng is situated at the edge of a Paleozoic fold belt known as the Truong Son Orogenic Zone, whose main deformation occurred during the early Carboniferous period. Đà Nẵng's topography is dominated by the steep Annamite mountain range to the north and north-west, featuring peaks ranging from 700 to 1,500 metres (2,300 to 4,900 ft) in height, and low-lying coastal plains with some salting to the south and east, with several white sand beaches along the coast.

Economy

Đà Nẵng is the leading industrial center of central Vietnam. Its GDP per capita was 19 million VND in 2007, one of the highest in Vietnam (after Hồ Chí Minh City, Hanoi, Bình Dương Province, and Đồng Nai Province).  By 2009, this had increased to 27.3 million VND.

Đà Nẵng led the Provincial Competitiveness Index rankings in 2008, 2009, and 2010 (and was second after Bình Dương Province in the three years before that), benefiting mostly from good infrastructure, good performance in labour training, transparency, proactive provincial leadership and low entry costs.

Exports increased to 575 million US$ in 2008, but fell back to 475 million US$ in 2009.


Agriculture, forestry, fishing

Despite its status as a city, 37,800 people in Đà Nẵng were employed in agriculture, forestry and fishing as of 2007, producing 45,000t of rice and 41,000t of fish. However, employment in these sectors had a clear negative trend in the first decade of the 21st century.  Gross output has also been decreasing during the second half of the decade.  Given Đà Nẵng's lack of agricultural land (9200ha as of 2007) and its location at the coast, fishing has been contributing more to the economy than agriculture, with a gross output more than twice that of agriculture.


Industry

Đà Nẵng is a diversified industrial center, including industries such as machinery, electrics, chemicals, shipbuilding, and textiles. Specific industrial products include aquatic products, fabric, clothes, bricks, fertilizer, cement, soap, paper, and medical tablets. The city's industry may diversify further. EADS is planning to set up an industrial park focused on the aviation industry in Đà Nẵng.

As of 2007, Đà Nẵng industry was dominated by the state sector, which made up 57% of gross output. This is about the same as its share in 2000. Interestingly, over 80% of the state industry is centrally managed (in other words: belongs to state corporations headquartered in Hanoi). Almost half of the rest is contributed by the foreign-invested sector, while the private domestic sector is still relatively small and has not been able to significantly increase its share compared to the state sector. Industry grew by an average 14.8% per year from 2000 to 2007, making it the main engine of economic growth. However, it has the second lowest industrial growth rate in the South Central Coast (behind only Khánh Hòa Province). Employment has grown at an average 5.75%, reaching 118,900 in 2007.


Trade 

Historically, Đà Nẵng's main marketplace has been the Hàn Market (Vietnamese: Chợ Hàn), which is located downtown near the western bank of the Hàn River, between Tran Phu and Bạch Đằng streets. This market, much like Bến Thành Market in Saigon, offers a wide variety of goods sold by many different vendors, such as clothing, silk, jewelry, flowers, foodstuffs such as dried fruit and fish, as well as coffee, tea and wine (including Vietnamese snake wine), etc.


Property

Many new construction projects are underway in Đà Nẵng, including several beachfront resorts such as the US$130 million Hyatt Regency Danang Resort & Spa, and the Beach Resort complex (including Ocean Villas and Marriott Hotel) in Ngũ Hành Sơn. Another ambitious project, the US$250 million Da Phuoc International New Town aims to construct an entirely new urban area on reclaimed land on the city's north sea coast, making it the first major land reclamation project in Central Vietnam. Plans for the Đa Phước project include the erection of a hotel and several smaller resorts, a 33-story apartment block and 60-story office block, an 18-hole golf course, a marina, as well as villas and international schools.

Subdivisions

Đà Nẵng is subdivided into 8 district-level sub-divisions:

  • 2 rural districts:
    • Hòa Vang
    • Hoàng Sa (Paracel Islands)
  • 6 urban districts:
    • Cẩm Lệ
    • Hải Châu
    • Liên Chiểu
    • Ngũ Hành Sơn
    • Sơn Trà
    • Thanh Khê

They are further subdivided into 1 commune-level town (or township), 14 communes, and 45 wards.

Before 1997, the city was part of Quảng Nam–Đà Nẵng Province. On 1 January 1997, Đà Nẵng was separated from Quảng Nam Province to become one of five independent (centrally-controlled) municipalities in Vietnam.

Internet, Comunication

Internet

There are plenty of Internet shops scattered around Da Nang that will charge a small fee for an hour's use of web, e-mail, or whatever you like. You'll be able to spot them by their walls lined with computers. Online gaming is huge (and controversial) in Vietnam, and you'll often see these shops packed with teenagers playing online games together, especially after school and into the evening. Some shops will have printers, some not; if you have a thumb drive, you can always load it up with what you need to print, and walk over to a print shop.

If what you want is a quiet place to relax and check your email, you may be better off stopping into a nearby coffee shop; most of these have free Wi-Fi, and outside of peak hours (early mornings and lunch time) they're fairly quiet.


Post

There's a convenient post office branch right on Bach Dang Road, right next to the Han River Bridge. There are also major branches in each of Da Nang's districts, so you can drop off a letter or postcard wherever you might be.

  • Bach Dang Post Office64 Bach Dang Rd (Next to the Han River Bridge), +84 511 3849 054.
  • Cam Le District296 Cach Mang Thang 8+84 511 367 3234.
  • Lien Chieu District138 Nguyễn Lương Bằng,  +84 511 3732 630.
  • Son Tra District4 Trần Quang Diệu,  +84 511 3950 686.
  • Thanh Khe District251 Nguyễn Văn Linh,  +84 511 3652 334.

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