KEFLAVIK

Iceland

Keflavík, meaning Driftwood Bay) is a town in the Reykjanes region in southwest Iceland. As of 2016, its population when combined with the nearby town Njarðvík, is 15,129.

Info Keflavík

introduction

Keflavík, meaning Driftwood Bay) is a town in the Reykjanes region in southwest Iceland. As of 2016, its population when combined with the nearby town Njarðvík, is 15,129.

In 1995 it merged with Njarðvík and Hafnir to form a municipality called Reykjanesbær with a population of 15,233 (January 2016).

History

Founded in the 16th century, Keflavík developed on account of its fishing and fish processing industry,founded by Scottish entrepreneurs and engineers. Later its growth continued from flight operations at the Keflavík International Airport which was built by the US during the 1940s. The airport used to hold a significant NATO military base and was a vital pre-jet refueling stop for trans-Atlantic commercial air traffic. It now serves as Iceland's main international hub.

During World War II the military airfield served as a refueling and transit depot. During the Cold War, Naval Air Station Keflavik played an important role in monitoring marine and submarine traffic from the Norwegian and Greenland Seas into the Atlantic Ocean. Forces from the United States Air Force were added to provide radar monitoring, fighter intercept, in-flight refueling, and aerial/marine rescue. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, however, the base's role was cast into doubt. The base officially closed on 30 September 2006, when the United States withdrew the remaining 30 military personnel.

In Iceland, Keflavík was renowned as a rich source of musicians during the 1960s and 70s, and is therefore also known as bítlabærinn or "The Beatle Town".

Climate

The climate of Keflavík is subpolar oceanic with cool summers and moderately cold winters. There is no truly dry month but July is the month that gets the least amount of precipitation. Winter high temperatures average above the freezing mark, and summer high temperatures are cool to mild. The warmest month on average is July with an average high of 13 °C (55 °F) and the coldest is January with an average high of 2 °C (36 °F).

Climate data for Keflavík Airport

MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °C (°F)2.2
(36)
2.8
(37)
3.2
(37.8)
5.6
(42.1)
8.8
(47.8)
11.4
(52.5)
13.2
(55.8)
12.7
(54.9)
10.1
(50.2)
6.8
(44.2)
4.0
(39.2)
2.7
(36.9)
6.96
(44.53)
Daily mean °C (°F)−0.2
(31.6)
0.3
(32.5)
0.6
(33.1)
2.8
(37)
6.1
(43)
8.6
(47.5)
10.4
(50.7)
10.1
(50.2)
7.5
(45.5)
4.5
(40.1)
1.8
(35.2)
0.4
(32.7)
4.41
(39.92)
Average low °C (°F)−2.6
(27.3)
−2.1
(28.2)
−1.8
(28.8)
0.5
(32.9)
3.7
(38.7)
6.4
(43.5)
8.3
(46.9)
8.0
(46.4)
5.4
(41.7)
2.5
(36.5)
−0.5
(31.1)
−2.1
(28.2)
2.14
(35.85)
Average precipitation days151616121211111313151416164
Source: yr.no

Geography

The local geography is dominated by fields of basalt rubble, interspersed with a few hardy plants and mosses. On a clear day, one can see Snæfellsjökull across the bay, some 115 km away.

Transportation - Get In


By plane

Keflavík International Airport (Icelandic: Keflavíkurflugvöllur) (IATA: KEF) is the most important point of entry to Iceland from abroad. The town of Keflavik is easily accessible from the airport. Simply follow signs indicating "Keflavik." The airport is about 5 km away from the town proper.


By bus

Transport between the airport and Reykjavik city is by road only. The distance is 50 km. A new fast freeway (dual carriageway road) was opened 2008. The buses have a timetable adapted to the flight schedule. They go to and from the Reykjavik bus terminal, taking around 45 minutes. To get to the domestic airport a bus change is needed at the bus terminal.

Transportation - Get Around

The town itself is small and easily explored on foot.

Hotels

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Sights & Landmarks

Whale watching tours leave from the harbor. These tours generally last about 3 hours and see dolphins, orca, minke and humpback whales. There is also a festival of lights in late August. Numerous walking paths lead out from town, including a stone path along the water that meanders several miles past seabirds to the lighthouse on the point.

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