RIMINI

Italy

Rimini is a city of 146,606 inhabitants in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and capital city of the Province of Rimini. It is located on the Adriatic Sea, on the coast between the rivers Marecchia(the ancient Ariminus) and Ausa(ancient Aprusa). It is one of the most famous seaside resorts in Europe, thanks to its 15-kilometre-long (9 mi) sandy beach, over 1,000 hotels, and thousands of bars, restaurants and discos.

Info Rimini

introduction

Rimini is a city of 146,606 inhabitants in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and capital city of the Province of Rimini. It is located on the Adriatic Sea, on the coast between the rivers Marecchia(the ancient Ariminus) and Ausa(ancient Aprusa). It is one of the most famous seaside resorts in Europe, thanks to its 15-kilometre-long (9 mi) sandy beach, over 1,000 hotels, and thousands of bars, restaurants and discos. The first bathing establishment opened in 1843. An art city with ancient Roman and Renaissance monuments, Rimini is the hometown of the famous film director Federico Fellini as well.

Founded by the Romans in 268 BC, throughout their period of rule Rimini was a key communications link between the north and south of the peninsula, and on its soil Roman emperors erected monuments like the Arch of Augustus and the Tiberius Bridge, while during the Renaissance, the city benefited from the court of the House of Malatesta, which hosted artists like Leonardo and produced works such as the Malatesta Temple. In the 19th century, Rimini was one of the most active cities in the revolutionary front, hosting many of the movements aimed at the unification of Italy. In the course of World War II, the city was the scene of clashes and bombings, but also of a fierce partisan resistance that earned it the honor of a gold medal for civic valor. Finally, in recent years it has become one of the most important sites for trade fairs and conferences in Italy.

The total approximate population of the Rimini urban area is 225,000 and the provincial population is 330,000.

info
POPULATION : 146,606
FOUNDED : 
TIME ZONE :• Time zone CET (UTC+1)
• Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
LANGUAGE :  Italian (official)
RELIGION : Roman Catholic
AREA : 134 km2 (52 sq mi)
ELEVATION : 6 m (20 ft)
COORDINATES : 44°03′00″N 12°34′00″E
SEX RATIO : Male: 48,6%
 Female: 51,4%
ETHNIC : Italian
AREA CODE : 0541
POSTAL CODE :  47921, 47922, 47923, 47924
DIALING CODE :  +39 541
WEBSITE : www.comune.rimini.it

Tourism

Rimini is a major international tourist destination and seaside resort, among the most famous ones in Europe and the Mediterranean basin,  thanks to a long sandy beach, well-equipped bathing establishments, theme parks and a number of opportunities for leisure and spare time. The economy of the city is entirely based on tourism, whose development started in the first half of the 19th century and increased after World War II.

Rimini’s origins as a seaside resort date back to 1843, when was founded the first “Bathing Establishment”, the oldest one of the Adriatic Sea.  The wideness of the beach, the gentle gradient of the sea bed, the equipment of bathing establishments, the luxurious hotels, the mildness of the climate, the richness of curative waters, the prestigious social events, made Rimini a renowned tourist destination among the Italian and European aristocracy.

This is a place where the Italians (and Russians!) go for their sea and sun, and therefore the food is excellent as well as the people being friendly and helpful. You won't find many tour buses filled with Americans or English here! This also means, however, that few speak anything but Italian (or Russian), so be sure to take your phrase book with you. The locals will work with you and are always happy to see a foreigner at least trying to communicate in their language.

History

Ancient history

In 268 BC at the mouth of the Ariminus river, in an area that had previously been inhabited by the Etruscans, the Umbrians, the Greeks and the Gauls, theRomans founded the colony of Ariminum, probably from the name of a nearby river, Ariminus (today, Marecchia). Previously the area had been Gaulish, from the 6th century BC, to that group's final defeat in 283 BC by the Umbri, in whose possession it remained until 263 BC when it became a Latin colony very helpful to the Romans during the late Gallic Wars.

The city was involved in the civil wars but remained faithful to the popular party and to its leaders, firstly Marius, and then Caesar. After crossing the Rubicon, the latter made his legendary appeal to the legions in the Forum of Rimini.

Ariminum was seen as a bastion against invaders from Gaul and also as a springboard for conquering the Padana plain. As the terminus of the Via Flaminia, which ended here in the surviving prestigious Arch of Augustus (erected 27 BC), Rimini was a road junction connecting central Italy and northern Italy by the Via Aemilia that led to Piacenza and the Via Popilia that extended northwards; it also opened up trade by sea and river. Remains of the amphitheater that could seat 12000 people, and a five-arched bridge of Istrian stone completed by Tiberius (21 AD) are also still visible. Later Galla Placida built the church of San Stefano.

Crisis in the Roman world was marked by destruction caused by invasions and wars, but also by the testimony of the palaces of the Imperial officers and the first churches, the symbol of the spread of Christianity that held an important Council in Rimini in 359.


Middle Ages

When the Ostrogoths conquered Rimini in 493, Odoacer, besieged in Ravenna, had to capitulate. During the Gothic War Rimini was taken and retaken many times. In its vicinity the Byzantine general Narses overthrew (553) the Alamanni. Under the Byzantine rule, it belonged to the Pentapolis, part of the Exarchate of Ravenna.

In 728, it was taken with many other cities by the Lombard King Liutprand but returned to the Byzantines about 735.King Pepin gave it to the Holy See, but during the wars of the popes and the Italian cities against the emperors, Rimini sided with the latter.

In the 13th century, it suffered from the discords of the Gambacari and Ansidei families. The city became a municipality in the 14th century and with the arrival of the religious orders, numerous convents and churches were built, providing work for many illustrious artists. In fact, Giotto inspired the 14th-century School of Rimini, which was the expression of original cultural ferment.

The Malatesta family emerged from the struggles between municipal factions with Malatesta da Verucchio, who in 1239 was named podestà (feudal lord) of the city. Despite interruptions, his family held authority until 1528. In 1312 he was succeeded by Malatesta II, first signore (lord) of the city and Pandolfo I, the latter's brother, named by Louis the Bavarian imperial vicar in Romagna. Ferrantino, son of Malatesta II (1335), was opposed by his cousin Ramberto and by Cardinal Bertando del Poggetto (1331), legate of John XXII. Malatesta Guastafamiglia (1363) was also lord of Pesaro. He was succeeded by Malatesta Ungaro (1373) and Galeotto, uncle of the former (1385), lord also of Fano (from 1340), Pesaro, and Cesena (1378).

His son Carlo, one of the most respected condottieri of the time, enlarged the Riminese possessions and restored the port. Carlo died childless in 1429, and the lordship was divided into three parts, Rimini going to Galeotto Roberto, a Catholic zealot who turned out to be totally inadequate for the role. The Pesarese line of the Malatestas tried, in fact, to take advantage of his weakness and to capture the city, but Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta, Carlo's nephew, who was only 14 at the time, intervened to save it. Galeotto retired to a convent, and Sigismondo obtained the rule of Rimini.

Sigismondo Pandolfo was the most famous lord of Rimini. In 1433 Emperor Sigismund soujourned in the city and for a while he was the commander-in-chief of the Papal armies. A skilled general, Sigismondo often acted as condottiero for other states to gain money to embellish it (he was also a dilettante poet). He had the famous Tempio Malatestiano rebuilt by Leon Battista Alberti. However, after the rise of Pope Pius II he had to fight constantly for the independence of the city. In 1463 he was forced to submit to Pius II, who left him only Rimini and little more; Roberto Malatesta, his son (1482), under pope Paul II nearly lost his state but under Sixtus IV became the commanding officer of the pontifical army against Ferdinand of Naples. Sigismondo was, however, defeated by Neapolitan forces in the battle of Campomorto (1482). Pandolfo IV, his son (1500), lost Rimini to Cesare Borgia, after whose overthrow it fell to Venice (1503–1509), but it was later retaken by pope Julius II and incorporated into the Papal States. After the death of pope Leo X, Pandolfo returned for several months, and with his sonSigismondo held a rule which looked tyrannous even for the time. Pope Adrian VIexpelled him again and gave Rimini to the Duke of Urbino, the pope's vicar in Romagna. In 1527 Sigismondo managed to regain the city, but in the following year the Malatesta dominion died forever.


Renaissance and Enlightment

At the beginning of the 16th century, Rimini, now a secondary town of the Papal States, was ruled by an Apostolic Legate. Towards the end of the 16th century, the municipal square (now Piazza Cavour), which had been closed off on a site where the Poletti Theatre was subsequently built, was redesigned. The statue of Pope Paul V has stood in the centre of the square next to the fountain since 1614.

In the 16th century, the 'grand square' (now the Piazza Tre Martiri in honor of three civilians hanged by the retreating Nazis at the end of World War II), which was where markets and tournaments were held, underwent various changes. A small temple dedicated to Saint Anthony of Padua and a clock tower were built there, giving the square its present shape and size.

Until the 18th century raiding armies, earthquakes, famines, floods and pirate attacks ravaged the city. In this gloomy situation and due to a weakened local economy, fishing took on great importance, a fact testified by the construction of structures such as the fish market and the lighthouse.

In 1797 Rimini, along with the rest of Romagna, was affected by the passage of the Napoleonic army and became part of the Cisalpine Republic. Napoleonic policy suppressed the monastic orders, confiscating their property and thus dispersing a substantial heritage, and demolished many churches including the ancient cathedral of Santa Colomba.


Modern history

On 30 March 1815, Joachim Murat launched his Rimini Proclamation to the Italian people from here, hoping to incite them to unity and independence. In 1845 a band of adventurers commanded by Ribbotti entered the city and proclaimed a constitution which was soon abolished. In 1860 Rimini and Romagna were incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy.

The city was transformed after the 1843 founding of the first bathing establishment and the Kursaal, a building constructed to host sumptuous social events, became the symbol of Rimini's status as a tourist resort. In just a few years the seafront underwent considerable development work making Rimini 'the city of small villas'. At the beginning of the 20th century The Grand Hotel, the city’s first major accommodation facility, was built near the beach.

During the first World War Rimini and its surrounding infrastructure was one of the primary targets of the Austro-Hungarian Navy. After Italy's declaration of war on 15 May 1915 the Austro-Hungarian fleet left its harbours the same day and started its assault on the Adriatic coast between Venice and Barletta.

During World War II the city was torn apart by heavy bombardments and by the passage of the front over the Gothic Line during the Battle of Rimini and was eventually captured by Greek and Canadian forces. Following its liberation on September 21, 1944, reconstruction work began, culminating in huge development of the tourist industry in the city.

Climate

Rimini has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen: Cfa) moderated by the influence of the Adriatic sea, featuring the highest autumn and winter mean temperatures and the highest annual low temperatures in Emilia-Romagna.Precipitations are equally distributed during the year, with a peak in October (75 mm) and two slight minimums, in January (42 mm) and July (43 mm). In spring, autumn and winter precipitations mainly come from oceanic fronts, while in summer they are brought by thunderstorms, coming from the Apennines or the Po Valley.

Humidity is high all year round, with a minimum of 72% in June and July and a maximum of 84% in November and December. Prevailing winds blow from W, S, E and NE. Southwesterly winds, known as libeccio or garbino, are foehn winds, which may bring warm temperatures in each season. On average, there are over 2,040 sunshine hours per year.

Climate data for Rimini

MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)20.4
(68.7)
21.1
(70)
26.6
(79.9)
30.0
(86)
33.4
(92.1)
37.3
(99.1)
37.6
(99.7)
38.9
(102)
35.2
(95.4)
30.4
(86.7)
26.0
(78.8)
22.7
(72.9)
38.9
(102)
Average high °C (°F)7.7
(45.9)
9.5
(49.1)
13.2
(55.8)
16.9
(62.4)
21.9
(71.4)
25.8
(78.4)
28.5
(83.3)
28.1
(82.6)
24.5
(76.1)
19.2
(66.6)
12.8
(55)
8.9
(48)
18.8
(65.8)
Daily mean °C (°F)4.0
(39.2)
5.3
(41.5)
8.5
(47.3)
11.9
(53.4)
16.6
(61.9)
20.4
(68.7)
23.1
(73.6)
22.8
(73)
19.4
(66.9)
14.8
(58.6)
9.0
(48.2)
5.2
(41.4)
13.4
(56.1)
Average low °C (°F)0.4
(32.7)
1.1
(34)
3.7
(38.7)
6.9
(44.4)
11.2
(52.2)
15.0
(59)
17.7
(63.9)
17.6
(63.7)
14.4
(57.9)
10.4
(50.7)
5.1
(41.2)
1.5
(34.7)
8.8
(47.8)
Record low °C (°F)−17.2
(1)
−12.8
(9)
−7.7
(18.1)
−1.7
(28.9)
2.5
(36.5)
7.5
(45.5)
10.1
(50.2)
9.8
(49.6)
5.8
(42.4)
1.2
(34.2)
−5.0
(23)
−12.8
(9)
−17.2
(1)
Source: MeteoAM 

Geography

Rimini is situated at 44°03’00’’ of latitude North e 12°34’00’’ of longitude East, along the coast of the Adriatic sea, at the south-eastern edge of Emilia-Romagna, at a short distance from Montefeltro and Marche. Rimini extends for 135.71 square km and borders the municipalities of Bellaria-Igea Marina, San Mauro Pascoli and Santarcangelo di Romagna towards NW, Verucchio and Serravalle towards SW, Coriano towards S and Riccione towards SE.

Rimini is located in a historically strategic position, at the extreme southern edge of the Po Valley, at the junction point of Northern and Central Italy. It is surrounded towards southwest by the gently hills of Covignano (153 metres high), Vergiano (81 m), San Martino Monte l’Abbate (57 m) and San Lorenzo in Correggiano (60 m), widely cultivated, with vineyards, olive groves and orchards, and dominated by ancient mansions. These hills, mostly made of clay and sand, connect the plains, created by Marecchia and Ausa, the two most important rivers of Rimini territory, to the higher hills of the Apennines.

The Marecchia river runs through its valley and the plain in a very large riverbed and, after receiving the waters of Ausa, it flows into the Adriatic sea through a deviator between San Giuliano Mare and Rivabella, while the ancient riverbed is used in its last section as the city’s harbour. The Marecchia, usually poor of water, was subjected to periodic, destructive floods near its mouth, where the riverbed became narrow after various bend: for this reason it was deviated towards North. Ausa creek, which was the eastern limit of Rimini for many centuries, was deviated as well after World War II, and its original riverbed was filled and turned into an urban park.

The coastal strip, made of recents marine deposits, is edged by a fine sandy beach, 15 km long and up to 200 metres wide, interrupted only by the mouth of the rivers and gently shelving towards the sea. Along the coastline there is a low sandy cliff, created by sea rise around 4000 B.C., partly conservated north of Rimini, between Rivabella and Bellaria-Igea Marina, at a distance of about 1,300 metres from the sea.Rimini’s territory, for its geographical position and its climatic features, is situated on the edge between the mediterranean and the central European phytoclimatic zones, and thus it represents an environment of notable naturalistic value.

Economy

Tourism in Rimini started as therapeutic stay (thalassotherapy, idrotherapy and heliotherapy), evolving in élite vacation in the late 19th century, in middle-class tourism during the fascist era and finally in mass tourism in the postwar period.

Rimini concentrates a quarter of Emilia-Romagna’s hotels, with over 1,000 hotels,  300 of which are open all year round,  and hundreds of apartment hotels, apartments, holiday homes, bed & breakfast and campings. Tourism is mainly based on seaside holidays, but also includes trade fairs and conventions, events, nightlife, culture, wellness, food and wine.  Rimini is a leading trade fair and convention site in Italy,  with an important Trade Fair (Rimini Fiera) and a Convention centre (Palacongressi di Rimini).

The city’s others economic sectors, such as services, commerce, construction industry, have been influenced by the development of tourism. Commerce is one of the main economic sectors, thanks to the presence of a large wholesale center, two hypermarkets, department stores, supermarkets and hundreds of shops and boutiques. Industry, less developed than tourism and services, includes various companies active in food industry, woodworking machineries, building constructions, furnishing, clothing and publishing. Notable companies are Bimota (motorcycles), SCM (woodworking machines), Trevi S.p.A. (electronic goods). Rimini is also seat of a historic railway works plant.

Agriculture and fishing were the city’s main economic sources until the early 20th century. Rimini boasts an important tradition in wine production (Sangiovese, Trebbiano, Rebola, Pagadebit, Albana wines) and an historic extra virgin olive oil production. The most common crops of the area, besides vineyards and olive groves, are orchards (peaches, nectarines, apricots, persimmons, apples, pears, cherries, kiwifruits and plums), vegetables and legumes (lettuce, zucchini, potatoes, tomatoes, beans, green beans, cauliflowers, fennels, strawberries), seminatives (wheat, barley, grain sorghum, corn, oat), sunflowers and canola. Fishing industry can count on a fleet of about 100 fishing boats, the most consistent of Rimini’s fishing department, which includes the coast between Cattolica and Cesenatico.

Subdivisions

Rimini is the main centre of a 50 kilometres (31 miles) long coastal conurbation, which extends from Cervia toGabicce Mare, including the seaside resorts of Cesenatico, Gatteo a Mare,Bellaria-Igea Marina, Riccione, Misano Adriatico and Cattolica. Theconurbation has about 300,000 inhabitants and originated around the mid 20th century due to urban sprawl following intensive tourism development.

The city of Rimini includes the seaside localities and districts of Torre Pedrera, Viserbella, Viserba, Rivabella, San Giuliano Mare towards North and Bellariva, Marebello, Rivazzurra, Miramare towards South.

The city proper includes the historic centre, the four ancient boroughs of S. Giuliano, S. Giovanni, S. Andrea and Marina, the seaside district of Marina Centro and various modern districts - Celle, Marecchiese, INA Casa, V PEEP, Colonnella, Lagomaggio - and outer suburbs such as Padulli, Spadarolo, Covignano, Grottarossa and Villaggio 1° Maggio, located outside of the Adriatic Highway beltline. More outer suburbs are S. Giustina, S. Vito, Spadarolo, Vergiano, Corpolò and Gaiofana.

The historic centre of Rimini, surrounded by the city walls built by Malatesta, and formerly bounded by Marecchia and Ausa, has a distinctive, regular urban structure of Roman origins. It was divided since Middle Ages in four districts (Rioni): Cittadella, Clodio, Pomposo and Montecavallo. The boundaries of these districts are not known, but it is assumed that they followed the current Corso d’Augusto, Via Garibaldi and Via Gambalunga.

Rione Cittadella, in the western area of the centre, was the most important district of the city and included the Municipal palaces, Castel Sismondo and the Cathedral of Santa Colomba. Rione Clodio, towards north, was popular and a peculiar urban structure tied with the near Marecchia river and the ancient coastline, situated much inland than today’s one. Rione Pomposo, the most wide district of the city, included large orchards and convents. Rione Montecavallo, on the southern part of the historical centre, is characterized by bowed, irregular streets of medieval origins, by the Fossa Patara creek and a small hill called “Montirone”.

Outside of the city walls, there are four boroughs (Borghi), which were entirely incorporated to the city by the urban sprawl in early 20th century.

Borgo S. Giuliano, along Via Emilia, dates back to 11th century and was originally a fishermen’s settlement. Dominated by the Church of San Giuliano, it is one of the most picturesque spots of the city, with narrow streets and squares, colourful small houses and many frescoes representing characters and places of Federico Fellini’s films.

Borgo S. Giovanni, on both sides of Via Flaminia, was populated of artisans and middle-class; Borgo S. Andrea, located outside of Porta Montanara, along Via Covignano, Via Montefeltro and Via Monte Titano, was strictly tied with agriculture and commerce of cows. Both this two boroughs were developed in 15th century; then they burned in a fire in 1469 and were rebuilt in 19th century, relocating small industries and manufactures, including a brick factory and a phosphorus matches factory.

Borgo Marina, situated on the right bank of Marecchia, was a portual borough, heavily transformated by Fascist demolitions and World War II bombings, which hit this area due to the proximity to the bridges of the city and the railway station.

Prices in Rimini

PRICES LIST - EUR

MARKET / SUPERMARKET

Milk1 liter€1.10
Tomatoes1 kg€2.00
Cheese0.5 kg€8.00
Apples1 kg€1.80
Oranges1 kg€2.00
Beer (domestic)0.5 l€1.30
Bottle of Wine1 bottle€4.50
Coca-Cola2 liters€2.15
Bread1 piece€1.50
Water1.5 l€0.61

PRICES LIST - EUR

RESTAURANTS

Dinner (Low-range)for 2€32.00
Dinner (Mid-range)for 2€50.00
Dinner (High-range)for 2€72.00
Mac Meal or similar1 meal€7.20
Water0.33 l€0.96
Cappuccino1 cup€1.35
Beer (Imported)0.33 l€3.50
Beer (domestic)0.5 l€3.50
Coca-Cola0.33 l€2.20
Coctail drink1 drink€8.00

PRICES LIST - EUR

ENTERTAINMENT

Cinema2 tickets€17.00
Gym1 month€52.00
Men’s Haircut1 haircut€15.00
Theatar2 tickets€58.00
Mobile (prepaid)1 min.€0.20
Pack of Marlboro1 pack€5.00

PRICES LIST - EUR

PERSONAL CARE

Antibiotics1 pack
Tampons32 pieces€5.60
Deodorant50 ml.€3.65
Shampoo400 ml.€3.00
Toilet paper4 rolls€2.70
Toothpaste1 tube€2.30

PRICES LIST - EUR

CLOTHES / SHOES

Jeans (Levis 501 or similar)1€78.00
Dress summer (Zara, H&M)1€34.00
Sport shoes (Nike, Adidas)1€79.00
Leather shoes1€92.00

PRICES LIST - EUR

TRANSPORTATION

Gasoline1 liter€1.45
TaxiStart€4.00
Taxi1 km€1.00
Local Transport1 ticket€1.50

Tourist (Backpacker)  

57 € per day

Estimated cost per 1 day including:

  • meals in cheap restaurant
  • public transport
  • cheap hotel

Tourist (business/regular)  

185 € per day

Estimated cost per 1 day including:

  • mid-range meals and drinks
  • transportation
  • hotel

Transportation - Get In

Transportation - Get In

By plane

As a renowned resort area, Rimini has its own airport. Rimini International Airport (IATA: RMI) Buses run the 7 km from the airport to the railway station in the centre of the town.

Transportation - Get In

By Train

There is a train line [www] that runs up and down the coast from Rimini, to Ravenna and Bologna in the north and Ancona in the south, via any number of smaller resort towns.

The Tourist Information Office right outside the train station, open 8:15AM–7:00PM, will store luggage for a fee of €3. They don't store it overnight, though—you have to pick it up before 7:00PM.

Transportation - Get In

By car

The A14, a six-lane motorway known as the autostrada del mare runs away to the north. The SS 72 heads inland towards San Marino. The SS16 heads in from the North and Ravenna.

 


Transportation - Get Around

Most hotels are within walking distance of the beach and the centre, but if you want to take a trip along the coast or inland, buses run regularly from the train station and are frequent and cheap.

Hotels

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Hotels

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Shopping

Downtown are the best fashion boutiques, where is it possible to find the best Italian designer brands (Gucci, Prada, Armani, D&G, ...). In early 2006 the first and one of the biggest (in Romagna) shopping malls, called "Le Befane", opened. It's so big that it changed the landscape of the west side of the city. For typically tourist stuff, the beachfront has small souvenir shops. If you enjoy scandalising the family or even your home country's postal service, don't miss some of the more risqué postcards on sale at any one of a number of the little shops on the seafront.

Restaurants

In Rimini you can find several good places to eat. Since the city is on the seashore it is suggested to have a fish-based dish. Some of the best restaurant are: Lo Squero, Il Lurido, Da Guido, Marinelli. Usually with every dish you will get the famous "Piadina", a thin and very tasty sort of bread.

At the beach in the San Guiliano a Mare area, there are restaurants on the beach where one typically dines Al Fresco in warm weather. Although one might be wary of such establishments, the food is excellent and inexpensive. A typical dinner might cost only €5-€6 for the meal alone. Sometimes they offer a multi-plate dinner (good for 2 or even 3 persons) for €18 that includes a 1/4 litre of wine. There are also excellent restaurants just off the main streets.

  • Yummy (Bar & Restaurant), via Mantova 70, Rivazzurra di Rimini (close to Carnaby Club),   +39 0541452838. 17:30 - 06:30. Famous for steaks, it's a combination of local Rimini style restaurant & international snack-and-burger bar.

Nice and friendly atmosphere with young and multilingual staff. € 10 - 20.

Near Rimini, at the Montegridolfo Castle

  • Osteria dell'Accademia (Osteria), Via Roma, 20 Montegridolfo RN,  +39 0541-855335. Inside the Montegridolfo Castle, the osterie dell'Accademia is famous for the typical Italian cuisine: for example tagliatelle, cappelletti, carne alla griglia, tartufo and mushroom. A beautiful panorama in front of the sea in a medieval castle between the hills. € 30/35 drink included.

Sights & Landmarks

  • Augustus Arch. A Roman arch built to celebrate the Roman emperor who lent it his name.
  • Tiberius Bridge. The Roman bridge that marks the beginning of theAemilian Way.
  • Domus of the Surgeon. An impressive archeological area documenting 20 centuries of Rimini history.
  • Federico Fellini MuseumVia Clementini 2, Rimini. Fellini's Museum is located within Rimini's historic centre and is popular with both Italian public and foreign visitors alike. This museum covers everything related to the great film director's life and career, from the earliest days of Federico Fellini (1920 - 1993) to his greatest masterpieces, including five Oscars. The Museo Fellini hosts regular exhibitions of drawings, photographs and sketches.

Rimini museum open: Tuesday to Friday - 16:00 to 19:00, Saturday to Sunday - 10:00 to 12:00 and 16:00 to 19:00 Rimini museum admission: free

  • Tempio Malatestiano35 Via IV Novembre,  +39 0541 51130. open M-Sa 8:30AM-12:30PM, 3:30PM-7PM, and Su, 9AM-1PM, 3:30PM-7PM.Bizarre burial chapel for Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta, the lord of the city, together with his mistress Isotta degli Atti and the Malatesta family.

Museums & Galleries

The City Museum (Museo della Città), main museal institution of Rimini, was inaugurated as “Archaeology Gallery”, at the ground floor of Palazzo Gambalunga in 1872, thanks to riminese historian Luigi Tonini, active in researching and studying the local archaeological heritage. The Archaeology Gallery was the first museum of the city and was conceived as a collection of Etruscan civilization and Roman antiquities, found in Rimini and in the surrounding countryside.

The civic museum was arranged in San Francesco monastery in 1923 and in 1938 was enlarged with a section of Medieval Art. The objects avoid the destructions of World War II, being moved between 1940 and 1943 in two different shelters in Spadarolo and Novafeltria. In 1964, the collections were moved to Palazzo Visconti and finally, from 1990, in the Collegio dei Gesuiti, a large Jesuites convent designed by bolognese architect Alfonso Torreggiani, built in 1749.

In the Archaeological department are exhibited grave goods from Villanovian tombs of Verucchio and Covignano, architectural pieces, sculptures, mosaics, ceramics, coins of Republican and Imperial eras, and the exceptional medical kit from the Domus del Chirurgo. The collection of the Roman Lapidary, exhibited in the inner courtyard of the convent, has funerary monuments, epigraphies and milestones.

The Medieval and Modern Art departments include collections of paintings, sculptures and art objectsby artists from Romagna (Giovanni da Rimini, Giuliano da Rimini, Guido Cagnacci), Emilia (Guercino, Vittorio Maria Bigari), Tuscany (Domenico Ghirlandaio, Agostino di Duccio) and Veneto (Giovanni Bellini), from 14th to 19th century. The City Museum arranges temporary exhibitions and promotes researches, study and restoration activities of the city’s historical and artistic heritage.

The Fellini Museum (Museo Fellini), dedicated to Federico Fellini, houses temporary exhibitions of documents, drawings, scenographies and costumes related to the movie production of the famous film director.

The Museum of Glances (Museo degli Sguardi), housed in Villa Alvarado, on Covignano hill, was instituted in 2005 acquiring the objects of the former Museum of Extra European Cultures “Dinz Rialto”, founded in Rimini in 1972 by explorer Delfino Dinz Rialto, the art pieces of the former Missionary Museum of the Grazie and other private collections. The museum has over 3,000 objects coming from China, Oceania, Africa and pre-Columbian America,  with paintings, sculptures, everyday objects, totems, masks,musical instruments and clothes illustrating how the Western world has looked at these territories’ cultures through history.

The Museum of Small Fishing and Marine (Museo della Piccola Pesca e della Marineria), in Viserbella, shows the history of Rimini’s Marine through a collection of boats, fishing tools, photographs and a large seashells collection, with pieces from all over the Mediterranean Sea.

In the municipality of Rimini there are also two private museums: the Aviation Museum (Museo dell’Aviazione) in Sant’Aquilina, close to the boundary of the Republic of San Marino, and the National Museum of Motorcycle (Museo Nazionale del Motociclo) in Casalecchio.

Things to do

Lounge on the 15km of beaches. Known as La Marina, the beachfront is by far the number one reason anybody comes to Rimini. Visiting the beach, swimming, etc., is free, but the major part of the beach, except for a narrow and over-crowded strip closest to the sea is occupied by sunchair-for-rent services. The beach is relatively busy, with loudspeakers shouting out commercials and vendors walking around, constantly offering their services.

Yes, there is an old town, but this is generally ignored by most tourists despite its major historical and cultural value, with valuable monuments dating back to Roman and medieval era.

Over winter, the marina side becomes a ghost town with a lot of shops shutting until the warm season starts up again, but the city centre is open all year round offering cultural events, good restaurants and great shopping opportunities, especially during sales period (jan-feb).

The new Rimini Fair host several important congress and fairs with a busy autumn-winter-spring schedule Rimini Fiera.

In late 2009 the new congress center will open very near the center of the city.

Remember to take a dip in the Adriatic. The bay is warm and inviting and home to many interesting and friendly mammals.

Nightlife

The whole town is geared towards tourists, so the night life is very good and there are bars everywhere. Once the sun goes down, the streets of Rimini come alive with lights, colour and noise as the sunbathers of the day become the revellers of the evening. There are however no "real" clubs in Rimini; only bars with dance floors. For real clubbing you have to go to Riccione, the next town over, which is about a 15 minute drive away. There is however one club called Carnaby's which is on the outskirts of Rimini and it has a free shuttle bus; the club is also within walking distance.

  • Carnaby Club. Open every night from March to October. The Club itself is a 3 storied building, each level having a different atmosphere, music style, bars and DJs. Free shuttle service on whole Rimini Area.
  • Life clubViale Regina Margherita 11. Lively nightclub boasting two floors. Open all summer long with a variety of music styles on both floors. Outdoor smoking area fitted with seats. Free bus to and from the club and free giveaways and drink promotions.
  • Opéra Maranoviale D'Annunzio 150, Riccione (seafront bathing area 134),  +39 3384430837 (for reservations quotes and promotions call Federico), e-mail: . 9PM-5AM. Open from May to half September. Dance club on the beach with a tropical setting and live music (Italian music, commercial/dance and revival on Fridays, commercial/dance and house on Saturdays). A dinner menu of meat and fish is also available 9:30PM to midnight. On request shuttle service on whole Rimini Area or you can take Bus Line 11.

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