MALAGA

Spain

Málaga is a municipality, capital of the Province of Málaga, in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia, Spain. With a population of 569,130 in 2015, it is the second most populous city of Andalusia and the sixth largest in Spain. The southernmost large city in Europe, it lies on the Costa del Sol (Coast of the Sun) of the Mediterranean, about 100 km (62.14 mi) east of the Strait of Gibraltar and about 130 km (80.78 mi) north of Africa.

Info Malaga

introduction

Málaga is a municipality, capital of the Province of Málaga, in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia, Spain. With a population of 569,130 in 2015, it is the second most populous city of Andalusia and the sixth largest in Spain. The southernmost large city in Europe, it lies on the Costa del Sol (Coast of the Sun) of the Mediterranean, about 100 km (62.14 mi) east of the Strait of Gibraltar and about 130 km (80.78 mi) north of Africa.

Málaga's history spans about 2,800 years, making it one of the oldest cities in the world. It was founded by the Phoenicians asMalaka about 770 BC, and from the 6th century BC was under the hegemony of Ancient Carthage. Then, from 218 BC, it was ruled by the Roman Republic and later the Roman Empire asMalaca (Latin). After the fall of the empire and the end of Visigothic rule, it was under Islamic rule as Mālaqah (مالقة) for 800 years, but in 1487, the Crown of Castille regained control after the Reconquista. The archaeological remains and monuments from the Phoenician, Roman, Arabic and Christian eras make the historic center of the city an "open museum", displaying its history of more than 3,000 years.

This important cultural infrastructure and the artistic heritage have culminated in the nomination of Málaga as a candidate for the 2016 European Capital of Culture.

The internationally acclaimed painter and sculptor Pablo Picasso, Hebrew poet and Jewish philosopher Solomon Ibn Gabirol and actorAntonio Banderas were born in Málaga. The magnum opus of Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuona, "Malagueña", is named for the music of this region of Spain.

The most important business sectors in Málaga are tourism, construction and technology services, but other sectors such as transportation and logistics are beginning to expand. The Andalusia Technology Park (PTA), located in Málaga, has enjoyed significant growth since its inauguration in 1992. Málaga is the main economic and financial centre of southern Spain, home of the region's largest bank, Unicaja, and the fourth-ranking city in economic activity in Spain behind Madrid, Barcelona and Valencia.

info
POPULATION :• City 569,130
• Metro 1,628,973
FOUNDED :   8th century BC
TIME ZONE :• Time zone CET (UTC+1)
• Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
LANGUAGE :
RELIGION :
AREA :• City 398 km2 (154 sq mi)
• Urban 827 km2 (319 sq mi)
ELEVATION : 11 m (36 ft)
COORDINATES : 36°43′10″N 4°25′12″W
SEX RATIO : Male: 49.5%
 Female: 50.5%
ETHNIC :
AREA CODE : 95
POSTAL CODE :  29001-29018
DIALING CODE : +34 95
WEBSITE : www.malaga.eu

Tourism

Málaga is a large city in the southern Spanish region of Andalucia and capital of the Málaga Province. The largest city on the Costa del Sol, Málaga has a typical Mediterranean climate and is also known as the birthplace of the artist Picasso. The city offers beaches, hiking, architectural sites, art museums, and excellent shopping and cuisine. While more laid back than Madrid or Barcelona, Málaga is still the center and transport hub for the hugely popular Costa del Sol region, which is flooded with tourists in the summer, and the city has certainly cashed in on the sun and sand, with lots of new construction as well as hotels and facilities geared to tourists. However, Málaga also offers some genuinely interesting historical and cultural attractions in its old city and its setting on the coast is still beautiful.

Málaga nightlife will make you think that nobody sleeps in this town even during the work week! However, it is especially busy from Thursday to Sunday, where people buy their drinks in the supermarkets and have them at night in controlled areas known as "botellodromos" in the city center, before going into the clubs.


Museums

In the early part of the 21st century, the city of Málaga invested heavily (more than 100 million euros in 10 years) in the arts to draw tourists and establish itself as a cultural Andalucia destination with 28 museums. Some notable and recently opened museums are:

  • Museo Picasso Málaga, opened in 2003, at thePalacio de los Condes de Buenavista, near the Cathedral.
  • Centre Pompidou Málaga, opened in 2015, a branch of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, located inEl Cubo, a cuboid glass structure in Málaga port.
  • Museo Carmen Thyssen, opened in 2011, sister museum to the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection in Madrid, located atPalacio de Villalón.
  • Museo de Málaga (Fine Arts and Archeology museum) at the Palacio de la Aduana.
  • Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Málaga (CAC Málaga), opened 2003, free admission, right behind the Alameda train station in an area known as Soho de Málaga. The most visited museum in Andalusia.
  • Fundación Picasso and Picasso Birthplace Museum.
  • Colección del Museo Ruso (Collection of the Russian Museum) Saint Petersburg/Málaga, opened in 2015, located in the Tabacalera building one km west of the city center..
  • Museum Jorge Rando, opened in 2015.
  • Museo de Artes y Costumbres Populares (Museum of Arts and Popular Traditions).

History

The Phoenicians from Tyre founded the city as Malaka about 770 BC. The name Malaḥaor mlḥ is probably derived from the Phoenician word for "salt" because fish was salted near the harbour. (Cf. "salt" in other Semitic languages, e.g. Hebrew מלח mélaḥor Arabic ملح malaḥ).

After a period of Carthaginian rule, Malaka became part of the Roman Empire. In its Roman stage, the city (Latin name, Malaca) showed a remarkable degree of development. Transformed into a confederated city, it was under a special law, the Lex Flavia Malacitana. A Roman theatre was built at this time. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, it was ruled first by the Visigoths and then by the Byzantine Empire (550–621).

In the 8th century, during the Muslim Arabic rule over Spain, the city became an important trade center. Málaga was first a possession of the Caliphate of Córdoba. After the fall of the Umayyad dynasty, it became the capital of a distinct kingdom ruled by the Zirids. During this time, the city was called Mālaqah (Arabic مالقة). From 1025 it was the capital of the autonomous Taifa of Málaga, until its conquest by the Emirate of Granada in 1239.

The traveller Ibn Battuta, who passed through around 1325, characterised it as "one of the largest and most beautiful towns of Andalusia [uniting] the conveniences of both sea and land, and is abundantly supplied with foodstuffs and fruits". He praised its grapes, figs, and almonds; "its ruby-coloured Murcian pomegranates have no equal in the world." Another exported product was its "excellent gilded pottery". The town's mosque was large and beautiful, with "exceptionally tall orange trees" in its courtyard.

Málaga was one of the Iberian cities where Muslim rule persisted the longest, having been part of the Emirate of Granada. While most other parts of the peninsula had already been won back during thereconquista, the Moors still occupied Málaga. Málaga was retaken by Christian forces on 18 August 1487, The Muslim inhabitants resisted assaults and artillery bombardments before hunger forced them to surrender, virtually the entire population was sold into slavery or given as "gifts" to other Christian rulers, five years before the fall of Granada.

On 24 August 1704 the indecisive Battle of Málaga, the largest naval battle in the War of the Spanish Succession, took place in the sea south of Málaga.

After the coup of July 1936 the government of the Second Spanish Republic retained control of Málaga. Its harbour was a base of theSpanish Republican Navy at the beginning of the Spanish Civil War. It suffered heavy bombing by Italian warships which took part in breaking the Republican navy's blockade of Nationalist-held Spanish Morocco and took part in naval bombardment of Republican-held Málaga. After the Battle of Málaga and the Francoist takeover in February 1937, over seven thousand people were killed. The city also suffered shelling later by Spanish Republican naval units. The well-known British journalist and writer Arthur Koestler was captured by the Nationalist forces on their entry into Málaga, which formed the material for his book Spanish Testament. The first chapters of Spanish Testament include an eye-witness account of the 1937 fall of Málaga to Francisco Franco's armies during the Spanish Civil War.

After the war, Málaga and Koestler's old haunts of Torremolinos and the rest of the Costa del Sol enjoyed the highest growth of the tourism sector in Spain.

Climate

The climate is subtropical-Mediterranean  with very mild winters and hot summers. Málaga enjoys plenty of sunshine throughout the year, with an average of about 300 days of sunshine and only about 50 days with precipitation annually. Its coastal location with winds blowing from the Mediterranean Sea make the heat manageable during the summer.

Málaga experiences the warmest winters of any European city with a population over 500,000. The average temperature during the day in the period December through February is 17–18 °C (63–64 °F). During the winter, the Málaga Mountains (Montes de Málaga) block out the cold weather from the north. Generally, the summer season lasts about eight months, from April to November, although in the remaining four months temperatures sometimes reach around 20 °C (68 °F). Its average annual temperature is 23.3 °C (73.9 °F) during the day and 13.7 °C (56.7 °F) at night. In the coldest month, January, the temperature ranges from 13 to 20 °C (55 to 68 °F) during the day, 5 to 13 °C (41 to 55 °F) at night and the average sea temperature is 16–17 °C (61–63 °F). In the warmest month, August, the temperature ranges from 26 to 35 °C (79 to 95 °F) during the day, above 20 °C (68 °F) at night and the average sea temperature is 26 °C (79 °F).

Large fluctuations in temperature are rare. The highest temperature ever recorded during the day at the airport is 44.2 °C (111.6 °F). In the month of August 1881, the average reported daytime maximum temperature was a record 34.8 °C (94.6 °F). The coldest temperature ever recorded was −3.8 °C (25.2 °F) on the night of 4 February 1954. The highest wind speed ever recorded was on 16 July 1980, measuring 119 km/h (73.94 mph). Málaga city has once recorded snow in the 20th century, on 2 February 1954.

Annual average relative humidity is 65%, ranging from 58% in June to 72% in December. Yearly sunshine hours is between 2,800 and 3,000 per year, from 5–6 hours of sunshine / day in December to average 11 hours of sunshine / day in July. Rain occurs mainly in winter, with summer being generally dry. Málaga is one of the few cities in Europe which are "green" all year round.

Climate data for Málaga

MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)26.8
(80.2)
30.0
(86)
31.4
(88.5)
33.0
(91.4)
35.0
(95)
41.0
(105.8)
44.2
(111.6)
44.0
(111.2)
40.0
(104)
36.3
(97.3)
30.4
(86.7)
24.6
(76.3)
44.2
(111.6)
Average high °C (°F)16.8
(62.2)
17.7
(63.9)
19.6
(67.3)
21.4
(70.5)
24.3
(75.7)
28.1
(82.6)
30.5
(86.9)
30.8
(87.4)
28.2
(82.8)
24.1
(75.4)
20.1
(68.2)
17.5
(63.5)
23.3
(73.9)
Daily mean °C (°F)12.1
(53.8)
12.9
(55.2)
14.7
(58.5)
16.3
(61.3)
19.3
(66.7)
23.0
(73.4)
25.5
(77.9)
26.0
(78.8)
23.5
(74.3)
19.5
(67.1)
15.7
(60.3)
13.2
(55.8)
18.5
(65.3)
Average low °C (°F)7.4
(45.3)
8.2
(46.8)
9.8
(49.6)
11.1
(52)
14.2
(57.6)
18.0
(64.4)
20.5
(68.9)
21.1
(70)
18.8
(65.8)
15.0
(59)
11.3
(52.3)
8.9
(48)
13.7
(56.7)
Record low °C (°F)−2.6
(27.3)
−3.8
(25.2)
−1.2
(29.8)
2.8
(37)
5.0
(41)
9.8
(49.6)
10.0
(50)
12.2
(54)
10.2
(50.4)
5.6
(42.1)
1.4
(34.5)
−0.8
(30.6)
−3.8
(25.2)
              
Source: Agencia Estatal de Meteorología

Geography

Málaga is located in southern Spain, on the Costa del Sol (Coast of the Sun) on the northern side of the Mediterranean Sea. It lies at the feet of the Montes de Málaga, about 100 kilometres (62 miles) east of the Strait of Gibraltar and about 130 kilometres (81 miles) east of Tarifa (the southernmost point of continental Europe) and about 130 km (81 miles) on north of Africa.

Economy

Málaga is the fourth-ranking city in economic activity in Spain behind Madrid, Barcelona and Valencia.

The most important business sectors in Málaga are tourism, construction and technology services, but other sectors such as transportation and logistics are beginning to expand. The Andalusia Technology Park (PTA) (In Spanish, "Parque Tecnológico de Andalucía"), located in Málaga, has enjoyed significant growth since its inauguration in 1992 by the King of Spain. In 2010, this high-tech, science and industrial park was home to 509 companies and employed over 14,500 people.

In line with the city's strategic plan, the campaign "Málaga: Open for Business" is directed towards the international promotion of the city on all levels but fundamentally on a business level. The campaign places a special emphasis on new technologies as well as innovation and research in order to promote the city as a reference and focal point for many global business initiatives and projects.

Málaga is a city of commerce and tourism has been a growing source of revenue, driven by the presence of a major airport, the improvement of communications, and new infrastructure such as the AVE and the maritime station, and new cultural facilities such as the Picasso Museum, the Contemporary Art Centre and Trade Fair and Congress, which have drawn more tourists.

The city hosts the International Association of Science and Technology Parks (IASP) (Asociación Internacional de Parques Tecnológicos), and a group of IT company executives and business leaders has launched an information sector initiative, Málaga Valley e-27, which seeks to make Málaga the Silicon Valley of Europe. Málaga has had strong growth in new technology industries, mainly located in the Technological Park of Andalusia, and in the construction sector. The city is home to the largest bank in Andalusia, Unicaja, and such local companies as Mayoral,Charanga, Sando, Vera, Ubago, Isofoton, Tedial, Novasoft, Grupo Vértice and Almeida viajes, and other multinationals such as Fujitsu Spain, Pernod Ricard Spain, Accenture, Epcos, Oracle Corporation,Huawei and San Miguel.

Subdivisions

Málaga is divided in 11 municipal districts.

DistrictDistrict
1Centro7Carretera de Cádiz
2Este8Churriana
3Ciudad Jardín9Campanillas
4Bailén-Miraflores10Puerto de la Torre
5Palma-Palmilla11Teatinos-Universidad
6Cruz de Humilladero

Internet, Comunication

 

Prices in Malaga

PRICES LIST - EUR

MARKET / SUPERMARKET

Milk1 liter€0.75
Tomatoes1 kg€1.05
Cheese0.5 kg€6.00
Apples1 kg€1.30
Oranges1 kg€1.05
Beer (domestic)0.5 l€0.85
Bottle of Wine1 bottle€3.60
Coca-Cola2 liters€1.33
Bread1 piece€0.68
Water1.5 l€0.70

PRICES LIST - EUR

RESTAURANTS

Dinner (Low-range)for 2€18.00
Dinner (Mid-range)for 2€34.00
Dinner (High-range)for 2
Mac Meal or similar1 meal€6.75
Water0.33 l€0.89
Cappuccino1 cup€1.35
Beer (Imported)0.33 l€2.00
Beer (domestic)0.5 l€1.50
Coca-Cola0.33 l€1.43
Coctail drink1 drink€6.00

PRICES LIST - EUR

ENTERTAINMENT

Cinema2 tickets€15.00
Gym1 month€41.00
Men’s Haircut1 haircut€7.60
Theatar2 tickets€42.00
Mobile (prepaid)1 min.€0.18
Pack of Marlboro1 pack€5.00

PRICES LIST - EUR

PERSONAL CARE

Antibiotics1 pack€6.00
Tampons32 pieces€4.75
Deodorant50 ml.€2.40
Shampoo400 ml.€2.50
Toilet paper4 rolls
Toothpaste1 tube€1.95

PRICES LIST - EUR

CLOTHES / SHOES

Jeans (Levis 501 or similar)1€69.00
Dress summer (Zara, H&M)1€30.00
Sport shoes (Nike, Adidas)1€62.00
Leather shoes1€71.00

PRICES LIST - EUR

TRANSPORTATION

Gasoline1 liter€1.19
TaxiStart€3.00
Taxi1 km€1.70
Local Transport1 ticket€1.30

[ultimate_pricing design_style="design06" color_scheme="custom" color_bg_main="#08748c" color_txt_main="#ffffff" color_bg_highlight="#75cdde" color_txt_highlight="#ffffff" package_heading=" Tourist (Backpacker)" package_price="41 €" package_unit="Per day" features_font_family="font_family:Cinzel|font_call:Cinzel|variant:700" features_font_style="font-weight:700;"]estimated cost per 1 day including:

  • meals in cheap restaurant
  • public transport
  • cheap hotel

[/ultimate_pricing]

[ultimate_pricing design_style="design06" color_scheme="custom" color_bg_main="#08748c" color_txt_main="#ffffff" color_bg_highlight="#75cdde" color_txt_highlight="#ffffff" package_heading="Tourist (business/regular)" package_price="154 €" package_unit="Per day" features_font_family="font_family:Cinzel|font_call:Cinzel|variant:700" features_font_style="font-weight:700;"]estimated cost per 1 day including:

  • mid-range meals and drinks
  • transportation
  • hotel

[/ultimate_pricing]

Transportation - Get In

Transportation - Get In

By plane

Málaga has the third biggest international airport (AGP) in Spain (after Madrid and Barcelona). As a holiday destination - the airport's primary tenants are discount carriers and charter airlines, although limited service on the European national carriers (Air France, British Airways, etc…) is available. Seasonal service (non-daily) is available from New York-JFK on Delta.

From the airport you can get a train, a bus or a taxi into town, or hire a car. A taxi to the city center will cost about €15. Bus line A express costs €2 (correct in Jan 2013) and is very convenient, running every 30 minutes and stopping at Alameda Principal and Paseo del Parque, where most of the local buses that serve the city stop as well. The route map for bus 19 can be seen online. The stop names are shown on an electronic display inside the bus so you can tell when to get off.

Renting a car at Málaga's airport is relatively cheap, but it is advisable to book in advance.

Transportation - Get In

By Train

María Zambrano, the city's sleek new train station, is about a km west of the city centre and served by RENFE's [www] high-speed AVE service, which zips travelers to Madrid in 2.5–3 hours (some with continuing service to Barcelona), Cordoba in 1 hour or Seville in 2 hours, with multiple trains running each line daily. Slower (and cheaper) trains are also available. For Granada, take a train to Bobadilla and change to a Granada-bound train there.

RENFE also operates two Cercanías commuter rail lines out of Málaga, one west along the coast via the airport C1 and the nearby tourist towns of Torremolinos and Fuengirola and one inland C2. Both lines make two stops in Central Málaga: one at the María Zambrano station (where you can connect to RENFE and the bus station across the street) and one at the end of the line at Centro-Alameda, located closer to the city center where Avenida de Andalucia crosses the Guadalmedina River.

  • City Centre Cercanías station. Closest entrance/exit to underground train station from city centre, Malaga-Centro Alameda. It's the first stop on the two Cercanías train lines, C1 and C2.

Transportation - Get In

By Bus

The main bus station is right across the street from the train station, a km or so west of the city centre on Paseo de los Tilos. The station serves buses from all over Spain and is a major transfer point if you're passing through the region.

A substation, the Muelle Heredia bus station, is located along Avenida de Manuel Agustin Heredia, adjacent to the port and handles many of the regional buses that serve the Málaga province, such as those going to nearby beach towns, many of which are operated by the Málaga Metropolitan Transport Consortium [www].

Transportation - Get In

By Car

The A-7 E-15 motorway runs along the coast to from Gibraltar to Almeria and through Murcia and on.

The A-45 motorway runs from Cordoba to Málaga.

Transportation - Get In

By boat

There is a ferry route between Málaga and Melilla in North Africa with Transmediterranea. Book early.

Cruise ships plying the Mediterranean call on the Port of Malaga.


Transportation - Get Around

Transportation - Get Around

By bicycle

Málaga is making big improvements when it comes to cycling. Nowadays Malagueños use their bikes more often to go to work or for recreational use in the weekends. Also Málaga established a cycling association supported by the local public transport association. The use of bicycles is promoted as being eco-friendly, fun, safe and healthy. Promotional campaigns in the form of group cycle activities or excursions outside Málaga are being introduced and this has led to big success.

Meanwhile Málaga also constructed several bike lanes. Due to this construction the centre is also better connected with the Northern part of the city. The historical centre of Málaga is already free of motorized vehicles, which makes cycling much safer than in the past. Also spots like the boulevard and the harbor are only accessible for pedestrians and cyclists. This 2km long boulevard is wide enough for cyclists to enjoy and cycle in a relaxing fashion.

Besides cycling in the city the coast area of Málaga is also worth exploring by bike. Going east from Málaga is probably the most popular route as its possible to travel along a route through the twin traditional fishing villages of Pedregalejo and El Palo all the way to the end of Rincon De La Victoria without going on the main road. Traveling west along the coast is not quite as straightforward, for example biking from Málaga to Torremolinos is a popular route but it is difficult to find a good route away from busy highways but it is possible.

Cycling inland north from Málaga is characterized by steep climbs with little in the way of long easy winding routes. The Montes de Málaga is probably the most notable mountain route from the city where an elevation of over 900m can be reached in less than 15km, this route is known locally as "The Reina" and is not for the lazy cyclist. Other notable climbs include a section known locally as "The Wall" which is a terrifying decent or climbers challenge depending on what direction its cycled. "The Wall" is a 9Km section between Moclinejo and Almáchar (this is the terrifying decent direction) on an inland route from Malaga to the coastal resort of Torre Del Mar.

An alternative mountain route for the committed cyclist is around the "Sierra de Mijas". Initially the route goes west from Málaga on quite a busy main road past the airport, then up a steep country road to the white villages of Benalmadena Pueblo and Mijas Pueblo, dropping down then to Alhaurin el Grande and back on the north side of Sierra de Mijas to Málaga via Alhaurin de la Torre.

bike2malaga - bike rental service. Address: c/Vendeja 6. Contact: mobile (+34) 650 677 063, email: [email protected]

 

Hotels

- BEST RATED -

Hotels

- BEST VALUE -

Shopping

  • Central Market (Mercado Central de Atarazanas), Calle Atarazanas (north of the Alamada Principal). M-Sa 08:00-15:00. A lively market featuring regional produce and olive oil, fish, meat, and cheese, housed in a 19th-century wrought iron building. Don't miss the recently restored enormous stained glass windows, as well as the large 14th-century Moorish gate incorporated into the building's southern façade.
  • Librería de Idiomas, on the Plaza de la Merced. A valuable resource, offering textbooks and dictionaries for learning just about any European language you could desire.
  • Ricardo del Cid Fernandez (aka. Del Cid), Calle Caldereria 11, is a fantastic old school hat shop in the old town (selling real sombreros, Panama hats, etc.). Worth to visit even just because of the atmosphere and the very helpful owner.
  • SuperSolCalle de las Atarazanas (across from the Mercado Central),  +34 95 221 07 25. Oct-May M-Sa 08:30-21:30, Jun-Sep 09:00-21:30. A conveniently located branch of the Spanish supermarket chain.

Restaurants

  • Bodeguita El GalloCalle San Agustin (Opposite to Picasso's museum's door). Typical andalusian tavern evironment, Sweet Málaga wines and the most traditional tapas.
  • Vegetarian Restaurant CalafateCalle Andrés Perez, 7. At in Málaga center, hidden gem around the corner from Thyssen Museum. Offers traditional Spanish & Andalucian dishes, with a vegetarian twist. Low-key interior with art for sale on the walls. Good choice for lunch and dinner. Tel: +34 952 22 93 44.
  • Cafetería Córdoba 7, Situated in street Córdoba, nº 7 in Málaga center, between the Port and Alameda Principal. Offers traditional and typical andalucian dishes, including soups, salads, meats and fishes or sandwiches, cakes, croissants or baguettes. Star dishes include:Gazpacho andaluz, Paella, Porra Antequerana, Rabo de Toro, Croquetas caseras, and many more. Breakfasts and meals with inexpensive prices.
  • Along the coast there are dozens of restaurants and chiringuitos (beach restaurants) where you can have fish, seafood, paella, sangria, etc. One of the most famous chiringuitos is El Tintero, at the east end, where there is no menu: the waiters sing out what they are carrying and they leave you a plate at your signal. From time to time, one of them offers to give you the bill.
  • The most typical thing to eat in Málaga is espetos, sardines squewered on a bamboo stick and grilled over a fire (typically driftwood); andpescaíto frito: all types of deep-fried fish from anchovies to squid. A speciality of Andalucia is fish (most commonly dogfish "cazon", although sometimes other fish such as tuna, "atun") marinated in a garlic and vinegar preparation - look on the menu for "Cazon en adobo". Try also the coquinas (small clams cooked in white wine). Simply delicious!

Jamon is a regional specialty, and is an aged, salted ham, from acorn-fed pork, similar to prosciutto.

  • Famous sweet Málaga wine can be tasted in popular pubs in the city center, like the famous old La Casa del Guardia (Avenue Alameda Principal) or the very typical El Pimpi where everyone, from celebrities to local teens meet.
  • Restaurante Gallego Candamil,  +34 95 232-3907. Cuarteles 15. On the street leading from the train station to the centre, this Galician restaurant is very popular with the locals. This is understandable when you see the great range of quality tapas at fantastic prices, e.g. tapa of empanada €1.25, glass of cider €1.15.
  • A Casa Gallega,  +34 95 204-2332. Fernán Núñez 2. Another Galician haunt a little further towards, although still outside, the center, this one does not have any menu but relies on the clientele knowing what they want. Good empanada, pimientos de Padrón. Atmospheric.
  • Parador de Málaga Gibralfaro,  +34 95 222-1902. Castillo de Gibralfaro. Some report being disappointed by the restaurant at the Parador. The food was sub par, but the service by contrast was exemplary, together with all the nice little free appetizers, aperitifs, etc. Wine list tended towards the expensive but with the excellent idea of a monthly wine choice 'balancing quality and value', for example a very palatable Ribera del Duero Crianza at €10. Set menu €27 pp (plus VAT). Fantastic view of the city, especially from the terrace.
  • Las Garrafas,  +34 95 222-3589. Calle Méndez Núñez 6. Winery and "taperia". Typical Málaga cuisine in a large and clean locale. Delicious and reasonably-priced food. Especially recommended are the mouth-watering "albondigones," large meatballs served alongside french fries.
  • Bodega-Bar El PimpiCalle Granada, 62 (entrance around the corner from the Museo Picasso),  +34 952 228 990, e-mail:. Daily 10:00-late. Enormously popular with both locals and tourists, this place serves up excellent food and wine. Despite being frequented by such celebrities as Antonio Banderas and Placido Domingo, the prices are very moderate.
  • Mesón Lo GüenoCalle Marín García, 9,  +34 952 22 30 48.Daily 12:00-24:00. Offers a large range of tapas and excellent wines.

Coffe & Drink

  • Málaga has a typically sweet wine called Moscatel made from muscat grapes.

Sights & Landmarks

  • AlcazabaC/ Alcazabilla 2,  +34 630 93 29 87. Tu-Su 9:30-19:00, closed on Mondays. A Moorish castle built in the 11th century on a hill in the middle of the city, this old fort is the best-preserved of its kind in Spain. Upon entering you'll climb up past the ramparts offering excellent views of the city and lush gardens to a small Moorish palace at the top which holds a number of artifacts from excavations on the site. €2.10, free Sundays after 14:00.
  • Roman Theater (Teatro Romano), C/ Alcazabilla 8 (next to the Alcazaba),  +34 951 04 14 00. Situated under the Alcazaba facing a small plaza are the beautiful remains of an old Roman theater. You can view them anytime from the overlook in the plaza, but if you want to get up close you can enter the attached building, where you'll be shown a short film and view some artifacts before entering the theater itself, where you can walk past the old stage and sit on the stone steps. Free.
  • Castillo de GibralfaroC/ Gibralfaro 11 (at the top of the hill, you can walk or take bus #35). Tu-Su 9:30-19:00, closed on Mondays. Another Moorish castle and the counterpart to the Alcazaba, the Castillo sits on a larger hill behind the Alcazaba and offers an incredible view of the city and neighboring suburbs from the ramparts that encircle the castillo. Within the fortress is a set of gardens and some displays, including an exhibit on the various military forces to have occupied the fort. Between the Castillo and the Alcazaba, visit the Alcazaba if you only have time for one, as the Castillo requires a hefty hike or a bus ride (bus 35) up the mountain. €2.10, free Sundays after 14:00.
  • Málaga Cathedral (Catedral de Málaga), Calle Molina Lario 9,  +34 952 21 59 17. M-F 10:00-17:30, Sa 10:00-17:00, closed on Su and holidays. Located right in the heart of the city centre and well worth visiting. €5.
  • Picasso MuseumPalacio de Buenavista, C/ San Agustín 8,  +34 952 127600. Tu-Th 10:00-20:00, F-Sa 10:00-21:00, Su and holidays 10:00-20:00. Exclusive paintings and exhibitions. €8.
  • Picasso's birthplace (Museo Casa Natal de Picasso), Plaza Merced 15,  +34 951 92 60 60. 9:30-20:00. Loads of objects and some paintings that the most famous artist of the 20th century created during his childhood. €1.
  • Museo Carmen ThyssenPlaza Carmen Thyssen, C/Compañía 10+34 902 303131. Tu-Th 10:00-20:00, F-Sa 10:00-21:00, Su and holidays 10:00-20:00 (open M and closed Su in summer). Opened in 2011 and has an excellent collection of 19th and 20th Century Spanish paintings.€8.
  • Interactive Museum of Music (Museo Interactivo de la Musica Málaga), Muralla Plaza de la Marina,  +34 952 210 440. Daily 10:00-14:00 and 16:00-20:00. Has one of the largest collections of musical instruments in Europe. €3.
  • Centro de Arte Contemporáneo(CAC Malaga). Closed Mondays.Located in a former wholesale trade market, it houses a good collection of works of art and installations. Guided visits.Free.
  • Plaza de Toros de la MalaguetaPaseo de Reding. M-F 10:00-13:00 and 17:00-20:00, closed Sa, Su and holidays.Málaga's bullring.
  • La Conception Botanical & Historical Garden (Botanical Garden), Camino del Jardín Botánico 3,  +34 95 225-2148. 9:30-20:30.Botanical and historical garden with beautiful views of the city from this garden; worth a visit. €4, guided visits and special prices for children.

Museums & Galleries

In the early part of the 21st century, the city of Málaga invested heavily (more than 100 million euros in 10 years) in the arts to draw tourists and establish itself as a cultural Andalucia destination with 28 museums. Some notable and recently opened museums are:

  • Museo Picasso Málaga, opened in 2003, at the Palacio de los Condes de Buenavista, near the Cathedral.
  • Centre Pompidou Málaga, opened in 2015, a branch of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, located in El Cubo, a cuboid glass structure in Málaga port.
  • Museo Carmen Thyssen, opened in 2011, sister museum to the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection in Madrid, located at Palacio de Villalón.
  • Museo de Málaga (Fine Arts and Archeology museum) at the Palacio de la Aduana.
  • Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Málaga (CAC Málaga), opened 2003, free admission, right behind the Alameda train station in an area known as Soho de Málaga. The most visited museum in Andalusia.Fundación Picasso and Picasso Birthplace Museum.
  • Colección del Museo Ruso (Collection of the Russian Museum) Saint Petersburg/Málaga, opened in 2015, located in the Tabacalera building one km west of the city center..
  • Museum Jorge Rando, opened in 2015.
  • Museo de Artes y Costumbres Populares (Museum of Arts and Popular Traditions).

Things to do

  • Visit the newly remodelled Port Area (south of the Plaza de Toros de la Malagueta). A hive of activity, especially at weekends, the new Port Area or Muelle Uno is a wonderful seaside addition to the city. Bars and restaurants abound overlooking the harbour and there are normally free music concerts and market stalls at weekends. A great place to people watch.
  • Rock Climb. There is lots of great rock climbing in and around Málaga. The amazing El Chorro gorge is 50 minutes drive to the North West and this also features the 'Kings Walkway' - an amazing pathway suspended high above the gorge. There is also Via Ferrata and rock climbing at El Torcal near Antequerra.
  • Beaches: The nearest beach to the centre is La Malagueta - this is fine for a day's sunbathing although quieter and prettier beaches can be found further east or west. It can be a nice (if rather long!) walk along the waterfront to reach these beaches, otherwise you could get a bus from near the bull ring in the direction of El Palo (e.g. line 33). Malaga East tends to have smaller beaches while Malaga West have long streches of beaches.

Festivals and events

  • Semana Santa (Holy Week).The Holy Week processions in Málaga are known for at least 500 years, and are one of the oldest in all of Spain. They begin Palm Sunday and end Easter Sunday. The Spanish Legion's procession is a must see on Maundy Thursday.

Annual cultural events

The Holy Week celebration, the August Málaga Fair (Feria de Málaga) and the Málaga Film Festival are the three major events held in the city.

The Holy Week has been observed for five centuries in Málaga. Processions start on Palm Sunday and continue until Easter Sunday. Images depicting scenes from the Passion are displayed on huge ornate tronos (floats or thrones). Some weighing more than 5,000 kilos. Famous is the royal archbrotherhood of Our-Lady of Hope Nuestra Señora de la Esperanza. They have more than 5000 members and 600 nazarenos. These tronos highlight the processions that go through the streets led by penitents dressed in long robes, with capirote, followed by women in black carrying candles. Drums and trumpets play music and occasionally someone spontaneously sings a mournful saeta dedicated to the floats as they make their way slowly round the streets. Some Holy Week tronos are so huge that they must be housed in places outside the churches, as they are taller than the entrance doors. Famous is the military procession of "la legion" (Royal congregation of Mena) playing marches and singing their anthem (El Novio de la Muerte) during procession.

During the celebration of the Feria de Málaga in August, the streets are transformed into traditional symbols of Spanish culture and history, with sweet wine, tapas, and live flamenco shows. The day events consist of dancing, live music (like Flamenco or Verdiales, traditional music from Málaga) and bullfights at La Malagueta, while the night fair is moved to the Recinto Ferial, consisting of restaurants, clubs, and an entire fair ground with rides and games.

The Málaga Film Festival (Festival de Málaga Cine Español (FMCE)), dedicated exclusively to films produced in Spain, is one of the most important festivals in the country. It is held annually during a week in March or April.

Nightlife

Málaga nightlife will make you think that nobody sleeps in this town even during the work week! However, it is especially busy from Thursday to Sunday, where people buy their drinks in the supermarkets and have them at night in controlled areas known as "botellodromos" in the city center, before going into the clubs:

  • Metropol, Cosa Nostra, Vaticano, Andén (big busy Latin club)
  • Velvet Club (aka Sonic, plays metal, hardcore, punk) [not open Sundays]
  • Nyx, Urbano, Village Green (Rock, Indie, etc.).
  • White, Abyssinia, Bar El Sound (Rap, Hip Hop, R&B)
  • Paradise/Punto G, Warhol (gay)
  • ChillHouse ( house-dance music)
  • There are several nice Moroccan-style tea houses in town, serving an amazing variety of teas in addition to other interesting non-alcoholic drinks.

Safety in Malaga

 

Very High / 9.0

Safety (Walking alone - day)

High / 7.0

Safety (Walking alone - night)

TOP

Pin It on Pinterest