NASSAU

Bahamas

Nassau is the capital, largest city, and commercial centre of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.The city has a population of 259,300 (nearly 80 percent of the entire population of the Bahamas).

Info Nassau

introduction

Nassau is the capital, largest city, and commercial centre of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

The city has a population of 259,300 (nearly 80 percent of the entire population of the Bahamas).  Lynden Pindling International Airport, the major airport for the Bahamas, is located about 16 kilometres (9.9 mi) west of Nassau city centre, and has daily flights to major cities in the United States, the Caribbean, Canada, and the United Kingdom.

The city is located on the island of New Providence, which functions much like a business district. Nassau is the site of the House of Assembly and various judicial departments and was considered historically to be a stronghold of pirates. The city was named after Nassau, Germany in honour of William of Orange-Nassau.

Nassau's modern growth began in the late eighteenth century, with the influx of thousands of American Loyalists and their slaves to the Bahamas following the American Revolutionary War. Many of them settled in Nassau (then and still the commerce capital of the Bahamas) and eventually came to outnumber the original inhabitants.

info
POPULATION : City: 259,300
FOUNDED :  Rebuilt/Renamed 1695
TIME ZONE : EST (UTC−5)  Summer: EDT (UTC−4)
LANGUAGE : English (official), Creole (among Haitian immigrants)
RELIGION : Baptist 35.4%, Anglican 15.1%, Roman Catholic 13.5%, Pentecostal 8.1%, Church of God 4.8%, Methodist 4.2%, other Christian 15.2%, other 3.7%
AREA : 207 km2 (80 sq mi)
ELEVATION :
COORDINATES : 25°4′N 77°20′W
SEX RATIO : Male: 48.8%  
 Female: 51.2%
ETHNIC : black 85%, white 12%, Asian and Hispanic 3%
AREA CODE :
POSTAL CODE :
DIALING CODE :
WEBSITE :

Tourism

Nassau has been recognized as a part of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network as a city of Crafts and Folk Art. It is one of only two Caribbean cities to receive this honor.

Downtown

Downtown is the hub for all activities in Nassau. Thousands of people visit daily, to shop, dine, sightsee and to enjoy the tropical climate of the city. While the busiest part of Downtown is the Bay Street thoroughfare and the Woodes Rogers Walk, located across the street from the port and parallel to Bay, the area extends for several blocks in each direction. It starts at West Bay, around the Junkanoo Beach area. A few hotels and restaurants are located on West Bay.

The next landmark is the British Colonial Hotel, which marks the beginning of Bay Street proper. Pirates of Nassau Museum is just across from the British Colonial Hilton. The next few blocks of Bay Street are wall-to-wall boutiques, with a few restaurants and clubs interspersed throughout the retailers.

Famous historical landmarks are also in the vicinity, including Vendue House, Christ Church Cathedral, and the Nassau Public Library. Although the tourist part of Downtown peters out after about seven blocks, smaller, more local stores are found all the way down Bay Street. At this point, Bay Street becomes East Bay.

The new Straw Market is also a very busy place on a regular day. After the fire in 2001 it has been rebuilt to a new, more modern look. It consists of four sections that lead to Nassau Harbour in the back. Also in that area are many jewelry shops and bars. A next soon to be tourist hub is Pompey Square.

Cable Beach

Cable Beach is recognised as the hotel district of Nassau. Five enormous hotels—two of which are all-inclusive—are located on this strip. The area is also known for its dining, the Crystal Palace Casino, and the golden sands of Cable Beach. Most of the area's restaurants are located either in the hotels or across the street. There is little to no nightlife. There is a bit of shopping, most of it located in the Wyndham. The commercial future of Cable Beach is being re-imagined with the development of Baha Mar, a resort and casino project that will bring more than 2,000 hotel rooms and the largest gaming and convention facility in the Caribbean to this section of New Providence Island in spring of 2015 (estimated opening date).

THINGS TO SEE:

Take a walk around Old Town, an interesting mixture of abandoned buildings and bright Caribbean structures. It doesn't take long to get away from the over-scrubbed tourist areas in the very center. Walk ten minutes uphill to the pink Parliament Building, which has a statue of an enthroned Queen Victoria out front.

Ardastra Gardens, Zoo & Conservation Center, Visit the Bahamas' only zoo. See the marching flamingo shows. Let the parakeets land on you as you feed them. $15. 

National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, West & West Hill Streets,  Opened in 2003, this showcases Bahamian art from the precolonial era to the present. The quality of art is rather uneven to say the least, but the renovated building — once the residence of the Chief Justice — is a sight in itself. Adults $5, Students/seniors $3. 

Pirate Museum,  Recreations of a pirate town, a pirate ship and a pirate battle, with a few real artifacts mixed in. Cheesy, but fun. Try to catch a guided tour. $12. 

Fort Fincastle. A small fort built in 1793 which overlooks the city of Nassau from a small hill south of town. Several cannons are on display. Tours are conducted Monday through Sunday, 8am to 3pm.

Straw Market, Bay St. Originally a locals' market, this is now devoted to touristy bric-a-brac. If you are in the market for some souvenirs, this is the place to come. Don't be discouraged by the initial price of things, as this is the only place you can haggle for a better one. Americans don't have to worry about exchanging any money either, as US currency is accepted universally.

Potters' Cay, under the Paradise Island bridge. Best known for its fish market, and there are plenty of stalls that prepare fresh conch salad, conch fritters and other Bahamian seafood delicacies, but there's plenty of other exotic tropical produce available too.

History

Nassau was formerly known as Charles Town; it was burned to the ground by the Spanish in 1684. Rebuilt, it was renamed Nassau in 1695 under Governor Nicholas Trott in honour of the Dutch Stadtholder (stadhouder in Dutch) and later also King of England, Scotland and Ireland, William III from the Dutch-German House of Orange-Nassau.

The name Nassau derives from the House of Nassau and ultimately from the town of Nassau, Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany. Due to a lack of effective Governors (after Trott), Nassau fell on hard times. In 1703 Spanish and French allied forces briefly occupied Nassau.

From 1703 to 1718 there was no governor in the colony and by 1713, the sparsely settled Bahamas had become a pirate haven. The Governor of Bermuda stated that there were over 1,000 pirates in Nassau and that they outnumbered the mere hundred inhabitants of the town. They proclaimed Nassau a pirate republic, establishing themselves as "governors." Examples of pirates that used Nassau as their base are Charles Vane, Thomas Barrow, Benjamin Hornigold, Calico Jack Rackham, Anne Bonny, Mary Read, and the infamous Edward Teach, known as "Blackbeard".

In 1718, the British sought to regain control of the islands and appointed Captain Woodes Rogers as Royal governor. He successfully clamped down on the pirates, reformed the civil administration, and restored commerce. Rogers cleaned up Nassau and rebuilt the fort, using his own wealth to try to overcome problems. In 1720 the Spanish made an unsuccessful attempt to capture Nassau.

During the wars in the Thirteen Colonies, Nassau experienced an economic boom. With funds from privateering, a new fort, street lights and over 2300 sumptuous houses were built and Nassau was extended. In addition to this, mosquito breeding swamps were filled.

In 1776 the Battle of Nassau resulted in a brief occupation by American Continental Marines during the American War of Independence, where the Marines staged their first amphibious raid on Fort Montague after attempting to sneak up on Fort Nassau. In 1778 after an overnight invasion, American raiders led by Captain Rathburn, left with ships, gunpowder and military stores after stopping in Nassau for only two days. In 1782 Spain captured Nassau for the last time when Don Juan de Cagigal, governor-general of Cuba, attacked New Providence with 5000 men. Andrew Deveaux, an American Loyalist who resettled on the island, set forth to recapture Nassau with 220 men and 150 muskets to face a force of 600 trained soldiers. Deveaux forced the Spanish to surrender on April 17, 1783, without a single shot fired.

Lord Dunmore governed the colony from 1787 to 1796. He oversaw the construction of Fort Charlotte and Fort Fincastle in Nassau.

During the American Civil War, Nassau served as a port for blockade runners making their way to and from ports along the southern Atlantic Coast for continued trade with the Confederacy.

In the 1920s and 1930s Nassau profited from Prohibition.

Climate

Nassau features a tropical monsoon climate with relatively consistent temperatures throughout the course of the year. Summertime temperatures reach about 32 degrees Celsius (90 degrees Fahrenheit) and the winter months have daytime temperatures between 23 and 27 °C (73 and 81 °F), rarely falling below 15 °C (59 °F).

Climate data for Nassau

MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °C (°F)25.6
(78.1)
25.7
(78.3)
26.7
(80.1)
27.9
(82.2)
29.6
(85.3)
31.1
(88)
32.0
(89.6)
32.1
(89.8)
31.5
(88.7)
30.0
(86)
28.0
(82.4)
26.4
(79.5)
28.9
(84)
Average low °C (°F)17.1
(62.8)
17.3
(63.1)
17.9
(64.2)
19.3
(66.7)
21.1
(70)
23.0
(73.4)
24.7
(76.5)
23.8
(74.8)
23.5
(74.3)
22.3
(72.1)
20.5
(68.9)
18.4
(65.1)
20.7
(69.3)
              
Source: World Meteorological Organization (UN)

Geography

Located on New Providence Island, Nassau has an attractive harbour, a colourful blend of old world and colonial architecture, and a busy port. The tropical climate and natural beauty of the Bahamas have made Nassau a popular tourist destination.

Nassau developed directly behind the port area. New Providence provides 200 km² of relatively flat and low-lying land intersected by low ridges (none of which restricted settlement). In the centre of the island there are several shallow lakes that are tidally connected.

The city's proximity to the United States (290 km east-southeast of Miami, Florida) has contributed to its popularity as a holiday resort, especially after the United States imposed a ban on travel to Cuba in 1963. The Atlantis resort on nearby Paradise Island accounts for more tourist arrivals to the city than any other hotel property. The mega-resort employs over 6,000 Bahamians, and is the largest employer outside government.

Prices in Nassau

PRICES LIST - USD

MARKET / SUPERMARKET

Milk1 liter$2.10
Tomatoes1 kg$4.00
Cheese0.5 kg$5.20
Apples1 kg$3.50
Oranges1 kg$4.00
Beer (domestic)0.5 l$2.80
Bottle of Wine1 bottle$15.00
Coca-Cola2 liters$3.10
Bread1 piece$3.50
Water1.5 l$2.25

PRICES LIST - USD

RESTAURANTS

Dinner (Low-range)for 2$45.00
Dinner (Mid-range)for 2$85.00
Dinner (High-range)for 2$130.00
Mac Meal or similar1 meal$6.70
Water0.33 l$1.25
Cappuccino1 cup$4.80
Beer (Imported)0.33 l$5.00
Beer (domestic)0.5 l$3.00
Coca-Cola0.33 l$1.65
Coctail drink1 drink$1.25

PRICES LIST - USD

ENTERTAINMENT

Cinema2 tickets$20.00
Gym1 month$65.00
Men’s Haircut1 haircut$20.00
Theatar2 tickets$
Mobile (prepaid)1 min.$0.43
Pack of Marlboro1 pack$8.00

PRICES LIST - USD

PERSONAL CARE

Antibiotics1 pack$
Tampons32 pieces$10.50
Deodorant50 ml.$6.00
Shampoo400 ml.$6.50
Toilet paper4 rolls$4.50
Toothpaste1 tube$4.40

PRICES LIST - USD

CLOTHES / SHOES

Jeans (Levis 501 or similar)1$70.00
Dress summer (Zara, H&M)1$52.00
Sport shoes (Nike, Adidas)1$125.00
Leather shoes1$120.00

PRICES LIST - USD

TRANSPORTATION

Gasoline1 liter$1.30
TaxiStart$3.00
Taxi1 km$1.90
Local Transport1 ticket$1.25

Tourist (Backpacker)  

121 $ per day

Estimated cost per 1 day including:

  • meals in cheap restaurant
  • public transport
  • cheap hotel

Tourist (business/regular)  

393 $ per day

Estimated cost per 1 day including:

  • mid-range meals and drinks
  • transportation
  • hotel

Transportation - Get In

Paradise Island is connected to New Providence Island (Nassau) by two bridges (one incoming, one outgoing). There's an entrance fee of $2 per vehicle.

There is also a ferry from Paradise Island to the main land. The schedule for the ferry is somewhat regular, but they try to wait until it is filled before departure.

If you're sailing your own yacht, you can dock at Hurricane Hole Marina, which has 90 slips for yachts that can be over 200 ft in length.


Transportation - Get Around

Most people get around the island by taxi, plenty of which can always be found hanging around outside the resort entrances. Since this island is small, many choose to walk. There are car companies available for those who have ether large parties, have trouble getting around, or like to make a grand entrance. There's Bahamas Experience and Majestic Tours Unlimited Hillside Manor.

Hotels

- BEST RATED -

Hotels

- BEST VALUE -

Shopping

  • Straw Market, Bay St. Originally a locals' market, this is now devoted to touristy bric-a-brac. If you are in the market for some souvenirs, this is the place to come. Don't be discouraged by the initial price of things, as this is the only place you can haggle for a better one. Americans don't have to worry about exchanging any money either, as US currency is accepted universally.
  • Potters' Cay, under the Paradise Island bridge. Best known for its fish market, and there are plenty of stalls that prepare fresh conch salad, conch fritters and other Bahamian seafood delicacies, but there's plenty of other exotic tropical produce available too.

Restaurants

Get out of the hotel and try real Bahamaian fare. You can get greasy fish, sides and desserts at one of the holes-in-the-wall in downtown Nassau for around $8. On the upscale side, there's no shortage of waterside seafood restaurants where it would be easy to part with $50 for an excellent piece of lobster. Sbarros, McDonalds and Chinese restaurants are mixed in to satisfy the budget diner or someone who has had enough conch.


Mid-range

  • The Shoal Restaurant and LoungeNassau Street323-4200. Sa-Th 7:30AM-11PM, Fri 7AM-7PM. If the tourist crowds are getting you down, take a taxi out to where the locals eat. Enjoy fish that falls off the bone, friendly service, and a dessert of guava $10-$20.

Splurge

  • Cafe MatisseBank Lane (behind Parliament Sq, off Bay St),  1-242-356-7012. Tue-Sat noon-11 PM. Tucked away on a quiet lane, Matisse serves excellent Italian food with fresh local ingredients. Reservations recommended; try to get a seat in the delightful garden courtyard, which is shady by day and lit up at night. "Proper" dress (no shorts or sandals) required for dinner. $50-70.

Sights & Landmarks

  • Take a walk around Old Town, an interesting mixture of abandoned buildings and bright Caribbean structures. It doesn't take long to get away from the over-scrubbed tourist areas in the very center. Walk ten minutes uphill to the pink Parliament Building, which has a statue of an enthroned Queen Victoria out front.
  • Ardastra Gardens, Zoo & Conservation Center,  242-323-5806fax: 242-323-7232, e-mail: . 9AM-5PM. Visit the Bahamas' only zoo. See the marching flamingo shows. Let the parakeets land on you as you feed them. $15.
  • National Art Gallery of the BahamasWest & West Hill Streets1-242-328-5800. Tu-Sa 10AM-4PM. Opened in 2003, this showcases Bahamian art from the precolonial era to the present. The quality of art is rather uneven to say the least, but the renovated building — once the residence of the Chief Justice — is a sight in itself. Adults $5, Students/seniors $3.
  • Pirate Museum,  1-242-356-3759, e-mail:. M-Sa 9AM-6PM, Su 9AM-noon.Recreations of a pirate town, a pirate ship and a pirate battle, with a few real artifacts mixed in. Cheesy, but fun. Try to catch a guided tour.$12.
  • Fort Fincastle. A small fort built in 1793 which overlooks the city of Nassau from a small hill south of town. Several cannons are on display. Tours are conducted Monday through Sunday, 8am to 3pm.

Things to do

The bus tours are pretty interesting. They'll drive you around, and tell you about the local government, tell you about different points of interest, and take you to old forts, and to Paradise Island, to see the famous Atlantis hotel resort and its stunning aquarium.

Nightlife

Nassau isn't a spring break mecca for nothing. The club scene is nightly and rowdy. Some popular establishments:

  • Señor Frogs,  (242) 323-1777. 11AM-3AM. right next to the cruise dock. Situated next a stinky sewer pipe, check which way the wind is blowing before you order. Doesn't serve Kalik.
  • Club WaterlooEast Bay Street. 8PM-4AM. on the north side of the island, about two miles from the dock.
  • Cocktails and DreamsWest Bay Street(242) 328 3745. draws a sketchier crowd, although it is on the beach. Come here in a group.
  • Club Fluid. draws a very local crowd. You will get lots of recommendations from Bahamians you meet but it is not a tourist club at all.

Cover charges average $20, although all major hotels sell "passes" for $5. With a pass, cover charge is only $5, so you actually pay $10. Cover charges on weekends can climb up to $45, so it's a good idea to get a pass from your local taxi driver/hotel desk.

You can also opt for an all-inclusive entertainment pass, which will include a schedule. Expect to follow this itinerary with at least 5,000 other co-eds. (It might be a good idea to pick up this schedule even if you don't plan on participating. It will give you a good idea of places to avoid on certain nights.)

Drinks in clubs can get expensive, depending on the club and its location. Many locals "drink up" before going out, to defray this cost. Otherwise they may be found in the parking lots with a cooler. Expect to pay at least $4 for a beer and $5 for a cocktail. The one exception is rum, which is cheap and plentiful. Cocktails with rum at a club will be strong.

Things to know


Orientation

Orienting yourself in central Nassau is fairly easy. Bay Street, which runs parallel to the shore, is the main shopping street, filled with an odd mix of expensive jewelry boutiques and souvenir shops. The hill that rises behind Bay St contains most of the Bahamas' government buildings and company headquarters, while the residential Over-the-Hill district starts on the other side.

Safety in Nassau

Stay Safe

The "Over-the-Hill" area south of downtown is the poorest part of Nassau, and tourists might want to be wary. It is, however, much nicer than "slums" in the Third World and, indeed, parts of the United States.

Some criminals target restaurants and nightclubs frequented by tourists. The most common approach is to offer victims a ride, either as a "personal favor" or by claiming to be a taxi, and then robbing and/or assaulting the passenger once in the car. Take care to ride only in licensed taxis, identifiable by their yellow license plates.

Be wary of the natives offering goods and services. They will tell you anything to get you jet-skiing, on booze cruises, etc.

Locals may solicit tourists with offers of marijuana, hairbraiding services, or a taxi ride. It gets monotonous but a friendly "no, thank you" and moving on will keep both you and the local happy.

Most Cuban cigars for sale in Nassau are counterfeit. Buy only from reputable dedicated tobacconists. See warning on main Bahamas page.

There is a high crime rate in Nassau at the moment. US Dept of State has labelled New Providence "Critical" and Grand Bahama "High". Crime previously among drug-related groups has now moved toward armed robberies of tourists. Recent local news reports suggest this is not abating.

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