PORT OF SPAIN

Trinidad and Tobago

Port of Spain is the capital city of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago and the country's third-largest municipality, after Chaguanas and San Fernando.The city has a municipal population of 36,963 (2011 census), a metropolitan population of 128,026 (1990 unofficial estimate) and a transient daily population of 250,000.

Info Port of Spain

introduction

Port of Spain is the capital city of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago and the country's third-largest municipality, after Chaguanas and San Fernando.The city has a municipal population of 36,963 (2011 census), a metropolitan population of 128,026 (1990 unofficial estimate) and a transient daily population of 250,000.

It is located on the Gulf of Paria, on the northwest coast of the island of Trinidad and is part of a larger conurbation stretching from Chaguaramas in the west to Arima in the east.

The city serves primarily as a retail and administrative centre and it has been the capital of the island since 1757. It is also an important financial services centre for the Caribbean and is home to two of the largest banks in the region.

The city is also home to the largest container port on the island and is one of several shipping hubs of the Caribbean, exporting both agricultural products and manufactured goods. Bauxite from Guyana is trans-shipped via facilities at Chaguaramas, about 8 kilometres (5 mi) west of the city. The pre-lenten Carnival is the city's main annual cultural festival and tourist attraction.

Today, Port of Spain is a leading city in the Caribbean region. Trinidad hosted the Fifth Summit of the Americas in 2009 whose guests included US President Barack Obama and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Port of Spain also hosted the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in 2009 and hosted a Commonwealth Business Forum in 2011.

Trinidad and Tobago's national airline, as well as the Caribbean's largest airline, Caribbean Airlines, is headquartered in Nicholas Tower as well as Piarco International Airport. These buildings dominate the city's marvelous skyline. Some of the tallest skyscrapers in the Caribbean are located in Port of Spain.

info
POPULATION : • City: 36,963
• Metro: 269,923
FOUNDED :  • Settled: 1560
• Incorporated (city): 1990
TIME ZONE : • AST (UTC-4)
• Summer: (DST) DST (UTC-4)
LANGUAGE : • English (official),
• Caribbean Hindustani (a dialect of Hindi),
• French,
• Spanish,
• Chinese
RELIGION : • Roman Catholic 26%,
• Hindu 22.5%,
• Anglican 7.8%,
• Baptist 7.2%,
• Pentecostal 6.8%,
• Muslim 5.8%,
• Seventh Day Adventist 4%,
• other Christian 5.8%,
• other 14.1%
AREA : 5.2 sq mi (13.4 km2)
ELEVATION : 10 ft (3 m)
COORDINATES : 10°40′N 61°31′W
SEX RATIO : Male: 49.40%
 Female: 50.60%
ETHNIC : • Indian (South Asian) 40%,
• African 37.5%,
• mixed 20.5%,
• other 1.2%,
• unspecified 0.8%
AREA CODE : 619, 623, 624, 625, 627, 641, 661, 821, 622, 628, 822
POSTAL CODE :
DIALING CODE : +1 -868
WEBSITE : http://cityofportofspain.gov.tt/

Tourism

A bustling and friendly city, Port of Spain is a great place to spend a couple of days and is the hub for the Trinidad's famous carnival. It has been the capital since 1757 and is the main administrative center, although not the largest town.

The main shopping area is between Frederick Street and Charlotte Street, running south to Independence Square (Brian Lara Promenade). As well as the bricks-and-mortar shops, there are numerous stalls on the street selling everything from fruit to CDs.

In the evening Independence Square is full of locals liming - hanging around, chatting to their friends and sampling food from the stalls scattered throughout. Wandering through here is a great way to get a feel for what Trinidad is about.


Things to see

  • The beaches.
  • Carnival. The Trinidad Carnival is one of the best in the world and hotels can be guaranteed to fill up when it is held and double their rates! Taking place in the days before Lent it is a mixture of parades and music and calypso competitions. Participants wear elaborate costumes and parade dancing through the streets to the sounds of a steel band or a soca band. Each year on Carnival Sunday a competition is held to award the King and Queen of Carnival. On Carnival Monday and Ash Tuesday, the bands compete to win the "Band of the Year" title. Everyone takes part, from young to old and rich to poor. In the weeks before the events the Steel Bands rehearse nightly at their Pan Yards. There may be several in one stretch of road, such as Western Main, and you can buy a beer and watch the rehearsals.
  • International Waterfront Centre, Wrightson Rd. A major skyscraper development designed to revitalise the city's waterfront with the Hyatt Regency Trinidad at its heart. This is the only section of Port of Spain's waterfront which is accessible to the public. 
  • National Academy for Performing Arts (City side of the Savannah. Can't miss it.). Opened at the end of 2009, the construction of this building led to numerous allegations of corruption. The design is supposed to represent Trinidad's national flower but it has been much criticised as being out of keeping with the environment. "Copulating slugs" was perhaps one of the politer descriptions. 
  • Royal Botanic Gardens, Cotton Hill. Established in 1818, these are one of the oldest gardens in the Caribbean. 700 trees of which 13% are indigenous to Trinidad and Tobago

Nightlife and restaurants

Port of Spain offers a range of nightclubs and entertainment complexes; a few of the best and most expensive ones arguably being Zen, 51 degrees, Coco Lounge, El Morocco and Shakers; however the list changes frequently as partygoers' tastes change. International and regional performers such as Beyoncé, Chris Brown, Sean Paul, Rihanna, Cascada, Akon, Usher, Maroon 5, Kumar Sanu and natively born Trinidadian International Super Star Nicki Minaj to name a very few, have visited Port of Spain.

A great variety of restaurants including Italian, Mexican, Lebanese, Thai, Venezuelan-Panyol, French, Japanese, Chinese, Creole, American and Indian can be found in Port of Spain with many concentrated on Ariapita Avenue, a popular entertainment strip, which also includes a Jazz Lounge and a Wine Tasting restaurant. MovieTowne's Fiesta Plaza, a tribute to Bourbon Street New Orleans, on the city's foreshore, features many new restaurants, open air dining and a bandstand with live entertainment. Port of Spain's award winning restaurants provide a wide range of local and international cuisines, accompanied by the traditional fast food chains. Many of the city's restaurants can be sampled at the Taste T&T Food Festival hosted at the Jean Pierre Sports Complex annually in May.

History

The Port of Spain was founded near the site of the Amerindian fishing village of Cumucurapo ("place of the silk cotton trees"), located in the area today known as Mucurapo, west of the city centre. The name Conquerabia is also recorded for an Amerindian settlement in this area; this may have been a separate village, another name for Cumucurapo, or the result of miscomprehension by early Spanish settlers, who established a port here: "Puerto de los Hispanioles", later "Puerto de España". In 1560, a Spanish garrison was posted near the foot of the Laventille Hills, which today form the city's eastern boundary.

The part of today's downtown Port of Spain closest to the sea was once an area of tidal mudflats covered by mangroves. The first Spanish buildings here, in the 16th and 17th centuries, were open mud-plastered ajoupas, interspersed between large silk cotton trees and other trees. The fort was a mud-walled enclosure with a shack inside, a flagpole, two or three cannon, and few Spanish soldiers.

By 1757, the old capital, San José de Oruña (modern Saint Joseph), about 11 kilometres (7 mi) inland, had fallen into disrepair, and Governor Don Pedro de la Moneda transferred his seat to Port of Spain, which thus became Trinidad's de facto capital. The last Spanish Governor of Trinidad, Don José Maria Chacón, devoted much of his time to developing the new capital. He compelled the island's Cabildo (governing council) to move to Port of Spain, and he limited its powers to the municipality. The 1783 Cedula of Population, which encouraged the settlement of French Catholics in the island, led to a rapid increase in the town's population and its geographical extension westwards.

In 1797, Trinidad was invaded by a British force under General Sir Ralph Abercromby. The British landed west of Port of Spain, at what is still called Invaders Bay, and marched towards the town. Realising his military resources were inadequate to defend the colony and wishing to avoid unnecessary destruction, Governor Chacón capitulated and was able to negotiate generous terms with Abercromby. Port of Spain remained the capital; the new British colonial government renamed most of the streets after British royalty or military figures, but allowed Chacón Street (which followed the old course of the St. Ann's River) to retain its name, in tribute to the former governor.

Port of Spain continued to grow in size and importance during the 19th and early 20th centuries, peaking in size in the 1960s at about 100,000 people. Since then the population within the city limits has declined in size as the downtown area has become increasingly commercial and the suburbs in the valleys north, west, and north-east of the city have grown. Today Port of Spain is the western hub of a metropolitan area stretching from Carenage, 8 kilometres (5 mi) west of the city, to Arima, 24 kilometres (15 mi) east; this East-West Corridor runs along the southern edge of Trinidad's Northern Range.

From 1958 to 1962, Port of Spain was the temporary capital of the short-lived West Indies Federation, though there were plans to build a new federal capital at Chaguaramas, on land occupied by the US military base established during World War II. Federation Park, a residential neighbourhood in western Port of Spain intended to house employees of the federal government, is a memorial to that time.

In July 1990, an extremist Muslim group held the prime minister and members of parliament hostage for 5 days while rioting and looting shook Port of Spain.The damage was a significant setback to the city's commercial district at a time of severe economic hardship, yet businesses returned. In 2005 there was an unprecedented series of small bombings in Port of Spain which caused injuries to bystanders. They ceased in October 2005 but the perpetrator has not been charged.

Climate

The city has a tropical wet and dry climate with warm to hot temperatures year-round with little seasonal variation due to its proximity to the equator, though nighttime temperatures dips somewhat during the winter months from January to March.

Temperatures typically range from 19 to 34 degrees Celsius, rarely above 35 or below 17.

The wet season lasts from June to November and the dry season lasts from December to May of the following year.Despite being in the dry season, December–February can get cold during the night hours.

Climate data for Port of Spain

MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)33.2
(91.8)
33.0
(91.4)
34.9
(94.8)
34.9
(94.8)
35.3
(95.5)
34.4
(93.9)
33.5
(92.3)
34.2
(93.6)
36.5
(97.7)
35.5
(95.9)
33.8
(92.8)
33.2
(91.8)
36.5
(97.7)
Average high °C (°F)28.0
(82.4)
28.9
(84)
30.3
(86.5)
31.0
(87.8)
33.1
(91.6)
31.5
(88.7)
31.3
(88.3)
31.7
(89.1)
32.2
(90)
32.2
(90)
31.5
(88.7)
31.1
(88)
31.07
(87.93)
Average low °C (°F)17.0
(62.6)
19.2
(66.6)
20.7
(69.3)
22.0
(71.6)
23.0
(73.4)
23.3
(73.9)
23.0
(73.4)
23.0
(73.4)
23.1
(73.6)
22.6
(72.7)
22.3
(72.1)
21.0
(69.8)
21.68
(71.03)
Record low °C (°F)14.6
(58.3)
16.1
(61)
16.7
(62.1)
17.2
(63)
18.9
(66)
19.7
(67.5)
18.3
(64.9)
18.9
(66)
19.4
(66.9)
19.4
(66.9)
17.9
(64.2)
15.7
(60.3)
14.6
(58.3)
Source #1: World Meteorological Organization

Geography

Port of Spain measures about 10.4 km2 (c. 4 sq. mi) in area and is located in the northwest section of the island of Trinidad, between the Gulf of Paria, Northern Range and the Caroni Swamp.

The Northern Range is the range of tall, biodiverse hills across the northern portion of Trinidad and is considered an extension of the Andes mountains of South America, although that is geologically incorrect. The Northern Range runs from the Chaguaramas Peninsula in the west to Toco in the east and consists mainly of steeply dipping metasedimentary rocks and lush rainforest containing a wide variety of plants and animal species. Port of Spain lies at the western end and the city climbs into the hills and valleys which are settled and largely deforested. The two tallest peaks are El Cerro del Aripo and El Tucuche which top 900 m.

Some of the city lies on land reclaimed from the Gulf of Paria, the calm sheltered bay separating Trinidad from Venezuela, while other parts climb into the hills above the city. Geographically, the Port of Port of Spain is ideal for maritime traffic, providing a natural harbour on Trinidad’s north-western coasts where adverse weather conditions are extremely rare.

Unlike Chaguanas and San Fernando, Port of Spain has a cool climate due to elevation and the surrounding Northern Range mountains. In the high, misty valleys and mountains that surround the northern outskirts of the city, temperature inversion is quite frequent and the mountains provide a cooling relief from the sweltering heat below. Blue Basin falls, a popular attraction, is located north in Diego Martin. This is the closest waterfall and is invigorating and refreshing.

Economy

Port of Spain is a shopping and business centre for much of the country. Most government offices are also located in the city and many important Government services can only be accessed in the Ministry offices located downtown. Within recent years, local banks headquartered here have helped it become a financial centre for the Caribbean and Central America region. Two of the largest banks in the Caribbean, Republic Bank, Trinidad and Tobago Limited and Royal Bank of Trinidad and Tobago (RBTT, reacquired by the Royal Bank in 2008) are headquartered here or base their Caribbean operations in the city.

Trinidad's economy is based on natural gas and oil. No heavy industrial sites are located in Port of Spain, but a major oil refinery and many petrochemical and iron and steel plants exist or are planned for sites south of it and closer to Trinidad's second city of San Fernando. However, the oil and gas majors and some service companies have located their headquarters in the city to be in close proximity to government services, infrastructure and the high quality of life many citizens of Port of Spain enjoy. Some of the oil and gas company headquarters located in Port of Spain (many others are found in San Fernando & Point Lisas)include BPTT, BGTT (British Gas), BHP Billiton, EOG Resources, Fluor, Repsol YPF, Atlantic LNG and Baker Hughes.

Trinidad and Tobago is considered one of the wealthiest nations in the Caribbean and some of this wealth is on display in Port of Spain. High-income proceeds from the international sale of natural gas has aided the country in the Port of Spain International Waterfront project constructed on former Port Authority Land. The Port of Port of Spain is the country's major port for containerized shipping followed by the Port of Point Lisas. Cruise ships also dock at the port which has: public international cargo-handling facilities for containerised, break-bulk, Roll-on/Roll-off and dry/liquid bulk cargo The Port also operates the ferry service between Trinidad & Tobago, as agents of the Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Tourism is targeted for expansion and is a growing sector in the city's economy, but it is not as important as in other Caribbean cities. Port of Spain has a large agricultural market, known as the "central market" where food produced in the surrounding hinterland is traded.

Subdivisions

Port of Spain's official population is relatively small, and reflects the narrow city boundaries including the central business district and a number of economically depressed and a few upscale adjoining suburbs. In addition to the official population, the adjacent East-West corridor conurbation has a population close to 600,000 people and the "big city" feel with its suburban car dominated commuting. The corridor is the built-up area of north Trinidad stretching from the capital, Port of Spain, 24 kilometres (15 mi) east to Arima. It includes the towns of Barataria, San Juan, St. Joseph, Curepe, St. Augustine, Tunapuna, Tacarigua, Arouca, and Five Rivers, once distinct communities and now districts within a continuous urban area. For the most part it runs along the Eastern Main Road, between the Churchill-Roosevelt Highway and the foothills of the Northern Range.

Internet, Comunication

SIM cards are easily available.

Prices in Port of Spain

PRICES LIST - USD

MARKET / SUPERMARKET

Milk1 liter$1.90
Tomatoes1 kg$2.80
Cheese0.5 kg$5.40
Apples1 kg$3.10
Oranges1 kg$2.40
Beer (domestic)0.5 l$2.10
Bottle of Wine1 bottle$18.00
Coca-Cola2 liters$1.70
Bread1 piece$1.70
Water1.5 l$1.40

PRICES LIST - USD

RESTAURANTS

Dinner (Low-range)for 2$36.00
Dinner (Mid-range)for 2$61.00
Dinner (High-range)for 2$100.00
Mac Meal or similar1 meal$6.15
Water0.33 l$0.70
Cappuccino1 cup$3.10
Beer (Imported)0.33 l$2.90
Beer (domestic)0.5 l$1.55
Coca-Cola0.33 l$0.90
Coctail drink1 drink$8.00

PRICES LIST - USD

ENTERTAINMENT

Cinema2 tickets$14.00
Gym1 month$50.00
Men’s Haircut1 haircut$6.50
Theatar2 tickets$30.00
Mobile (prepaid)1 min.$0.20
Pack of Marlboro1 pack$3.90

PRICES LIST - USD

PERSONAL CARE

Antibiotics1 pack$9.00
Tampons32 pieces$4.70
Deodorant50 ml.$3.65
Shampoo400 ml.$5.00
Toilet paper4 rolls$1.80
Toothpaste1 tube$2.05

PRICES LIST - USD

CLOTHES / SHOES

Jeans (Levis 501 or similar)1$60.00
Dress summer (Zara, H&M)1$52.00
Sport shoes (Nike, Adidas)1$110.00
Leather shoes1$72.00

PRICES LIST - USD

TRANSPORTATION

Gasoline1 liter$0.50
TaxiStart
Taxi1 km
Local Transport1 ticket$0.80

Transportation - Get In

Transportation - Get In

By plane

Piarco International Airport is about 45 minutes from the center of Port of Spain. Allow more when flying out if your trip coincides with the evening rush hour as many people commute from the area around and beyond the airport to downtown Port of Spain.

The airport is served by:

  • American Airlines
  • Caribbean Airlines
  • British Airways
  • Liat
  • United Airlines
  • Delta
  • Copa Airlines

...and several others.

From Tobago there are 14 flights a day on Tobago Express, which is operated by Caribbean Airlines. Flights are on a De Havilland Dash 8, cost US$24 each way and last about 20 minutes. Despite the great frequency of flights these can get booked out very easily.

Transportation - Get In

By boat

There is a Wednesday ferry from Venezuela. 

From Scarborough, Tobago there are hydrofoils that take 2 1/2 hours and conventional ferries that take 5 1/2 hours to Port of Spain. Hydrofoils cost 50 TT one way.

Transportation - Get In

By Bus

There is a coach from the airport at Piarco weekdays only and it costs 4 TT. The coach will drop you off at City Gate.

 


Transportation - Get Around

Taxis are expensive, with a minimum price for a journey within Port-of-Spain being US$10. There are no standard color coded markings for taxis in Port-of-Spain e.g. yellow taxis and by all appearance resembles private motor vehicles. However, all vehicles for hire will have an license plate starting with H instead and you should not be surprised if one stop by and ask if you want a ride. Remember to check if it is a taxi!

Hotels

- BEST RATED -

Hotels

- BEST VALUE -

Restaurants

A great variety of restaurants including Italian, Mexican, Lebanese, Thai, Venezuelan-Panyol, French, Japanese, Chinese, Creole, American and Indian can be found in Port of Spain with many concentrated on Ariapita Avenue, a popular entertainment strip, which also includes a Jazz Lounge and a Wine Tasting restaurant. MovieTowne's Fiesta Plaza,  a tribute to Bourbon Street New Orleans, on the city's foreshore, features many new restaurants, open air dining and a bandstand with live entertainment. Port of Spain's award winning restaurants  provide a wide range of local and international cuisines, accompanied by the traditional fast food chains. Many of the city's restaurants can be sampled at the Taste T&T Food Festival hosted at the Jean Pierre Sports Complex annually in May.

There are many types of traditional and Trinidad food that must be tried, some of these include:

  • Roti
  • Doubles
  • Bake and Shark
  • Chow (e.g. Mango/Pineapple Chow)
  • West Indian Style Curry
  • Jerk Chicken/Fish

Budget

Western Main Highway at St James is a popular night spot with a long stretch of bars and eateries. There are also many food stalls selling Rotis, Doubles, and other local delicacies.

A local flour and chick peas delicacy called Doubles (available all over the island, even just outside the airport). There are several stalls on Independence Square can get these for 5TT each - make sure to get their early though as they tend to sell out pretty quickly.

American fast food chains like Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) and Burger King (try the totally local fast food chain Royal Castle!)


Mid-range

Ariapita Avenue, in the Woodbrook neighborhood of Port-of-Spain, is a popular dining and nightlife area with a good selection of mid-range restaurants.

To eateries like - Benihana and many others available at Trincity Mall, 15 mins from Piarco Airport


Splurge

  • Prime (BHP Billiton Building): One of the top steakhouse in Trinidad, look to spend around USD200++ and above. [www]
  • Chaud (2 Queen's Park West): Specialises in fusion cuisine, excellent location at Savanna and food. USD100++ and above. [www]

Coffe & Drink

Beer is a little expensive, priced around 9 TT (1.5 USD) at grocery stores and 15 TT (2.5 USD) at restaurants for a 275mL bottle. The local brew consist of Carib and Stag (lager). Rum is widely available and the local distiller Angostura is among one of the top producers in the region with its Royal Oak line.

For non-alcoholic drinks, Trinidians in general favor a sweeter flavor. Some of the local beverages can be found in the list below:

  • Sorrel, a sweet dark pink beverage made from the Roselle plant
  • Mauby, a bitter sweet drink with a herbal flavor made from the bark of a local tree
  • Peanut Punch, a drink made from peanut butter, milk and sugar

Sights & Landmarks

  • The beaches.
  • Carnival. The Trinidad Carnival is one of the best in the world and hotels can be guaranteed to fill up when it is held and double their rates! Taking place in the days before Lent it is a mixture of parades and music and calypso competitions. Participants wear elaborate costumes and parade dancing through the streets to the sounds of a steel band or a soca band. Each year on Carnival Sunday a competition is held to award the King and Queen of Carnival. On Carnival Monday and Ash Tuesday, the bands compete to win the "Band of the Year" title. Everyone takes part, from young to old and rich to poor. In the weeks before the events the Steel Bands rehearse nightly at their Pan Yards. There may be several in one stretch of road, such as Western Main, and you can buy a beer and watch the rehearsals.
  • International Waterfront CentreWrightson Rd. A major skyscraper development designed to revitalise the city's waterfront with the Hyatt Regency Trinidad at its heart. This is the only section of Port of Spain's waterfront which is accessible to the public.
  • National Academy for Performing Arts (City side of the Savannah. Can't miss it.).Opened at the end of 2009, the construction of this building led to numerous allegations of corruption. The design is supposed to represent Trinidad's national flower but it has been much criticised as being out of keeping with the environment. "Copulating slugs" was perhaps one of the politer descriptions.
  • Royal Botanic GardensCotton Hill. Established in 1818, these are one of the oldest gardens in the Caribbean. 700 trees of which 13% are indigenous to Trinidad and Tobago.

Museums & Galleries

The National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago is the country’s most important museum. It displays depictions of national festivals, Carnival, life during the World War II and artifacts from the country’s earliest settlers, the Amerindians. There are also displays by leading local and international artists, with exhibitions being mounted at various times during the year. The museum was established in 1892 and was originally called the Royal Victoria Institute, as it was built as part of the preparation for Queen Victoria’s jubilee.

The National Museum has two smaller branch museums:

Fort San Andres which is located on South Quay, opposite City Gate. According to Geoffrey MacLean, in the Trinidad Express Newspaper in December 2014, "the fort, which replaced a mound of mud and wood that served as the only defence of Port of Spain, was, when completed in 1787, located offshore and linked to the mainland by a wooden bridge."

The Trinidad and Tobago Police Service Museum which is located at the Old Police Headquarters on St. Vincent Street. This Museum is in close proximity to the Old Cabildo Building, called the Law Museum as of August 2012 by the Guardian TT when it was reopened,  the Ministry of Legal Affairs, and the Colonial Life Insurance Co Ltd building, known as CLICO, and opposite to CLICO is the RED HOUSE.

Things to do

  • The Queen's Park Savannah or, more usually, just the Savannah is a large park in the middle of the city. It has a circumference of 3.5 km and is a popular spot around sunset for joggers and walkers. With one-way traffic circulating clockwise, it claims to be the world's largest roundabout or traffic circle.

Nightlife

Port of Spain offers a range of nightclubs and entertainment complexes; a few of the best and most expensive ones arguably being Zen, 51 degrees, Coco Lounge, El Morocco and Shakers; however the list changes frequently as partygoers' tastes change. International and regional performers such as Beyoncé, Chris Brown, Sean Paul, Rihanna, Cascada,Akon, Usher, Maroon 5, Kumar Sanu and natively born Trinidadian International Super Star Nicki Minaj to name a very few, have visited Port of Spain.

Safety in Port of Spain

Stay Safe


Trinidad has a bad reputation (it has a shocking high murder rate), but if you are sensible and stick to the main areas, you shouldn't have a problem and will find the locals incredibly friendly. Avoid any ostentatious display of wealth, and don't wander down dark backstreets at night on your own, and you shouldn't experience any problems at all.

Wear sunblock, even in early morning or late afternoon, since Trinidad is very close to the equator.

Mid. / 5.8

Safety (Walking alone - day)

Very Low / 1.0

Safety (Walking alone - night)

Trinidad and Tobago - Travel guide

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