PALM SPRINGS

California, United States

Palm Springs is a resort city in the California desert. It became a destination during the 1950s and 1960s when Hollywood movie stars flocked there in droves. Nowadays, the area offers entertainment for all ages, although the most common demographics consists of retirees. Palm Springs offers a wealth of indoor and outdoor activities. Known for its hiking, mid-century modern architecture, stunning natural beauty and sparkling pools, Palm Springs has the perfect blend of outdoor activities and casual relaxation.

Info Palm Springs

introduction

Palm Springs is a desert resort city in Riverside County, California, United States, within the Coachella Valley. It is located approximately 55 mi (89 km) east of San Bernardino, 107 mi (172 km) east of Los Angeles, 123 mi (198 km) northeast of San Diego, and 268 mi (431 km) west of Phoenix, Arizona. The population was 44,552 as of the 2010 census. Palm Springs covers approximately 94 square miles (240 km2), making it the largest city in the county by land area.

Biking, golf, hiking, horseback riding, swimming, and tennis in the nearby desert and mountain areas are major forms of recreation in Palm Springs. The city is also famous for its mid-century modern architecture and design elements.

info
POPULATION :• Total 44,552
• Estimate (2013) 46,281
FOUNDED :  Incorporated April 20, 1938
TIME ZONE :• Time zone Pacific (UTC−8)
• Summer (DST) PDT (UTC−7)
LANGUAGE : English
RELIGION : 
AREA :• Total 94.975 sq mi (245.984 km2)
• Land 94.116 sq mi (243.761 km2)
• Water 0.859 sq mi (2.224 km2) 0.90%
ELEVATION : 479 ft (146 m)
COORDINATES : 33°49′49″N 116°32′43″W
SEX RATIO :
ETHNIC : 
AREA CODE : 442/760
POSTAL CODE : 92262–92264
DIALING CODE : 
WEBSITE :  palmsprings-ca.gov

Tourism

Palm Springs is a resort city in the California desert. It became a destination during the 1950s and 1960s when Hollywood movie stars flocked there in droves. Nowadays, the area offers entertainment for all ages, although the most common demographics consists of retirees. Palm Springs offers a wealth of indoor and outdoor activities. Known for its hiking, mid-century modern architecture, stunning natural beauty and sparkling pools, Palm Springs has the perfect blend of outdoor activities and casual relaxation.

Palm Springs is also a favorite for gay travelers and naturist communities.

Tourism is a major factor in the city's economy with 1.6 million visitors in 2011. The city has over 130 hotels and resorts, numerous bed and breakfasts and over 100 restaurants and dining spots.

Following the recession of the late 2000s/early 2010s, Palm Springs is revitalizing its Downtown or "the Village". Rebuilding started with the demolition of the Bank of America building in January 2012, with the Desert Fashion Plaza scheduled for demolition later in 2012.

The movement behind Mid-Century modern architecture (1950s/60s era) in Palm Springs is backed by architecture enthusiasts, artistic designers and local historians to preserve many of Central Palm Springs' buildings and houses of famous celebrities, businessmen and politicians.

History

Founding

Archaeological research has shown that the Cahuilla people have lived in the area for the past 350–500 years. The Cahuilla name for the area was "Se-Khi" (boiling water). When the Agua Caliente Reservation was established by the United States government in 1896, the reservation land was composed of alternating sections (640 acres) of land laid out across the desert in a checkerboard pattern. The alternating non-reservation sections were granted to the Southern Pacific Railroad as an incentive to bring rail lines through the open desert.

Presently the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians is composed of several smaller bands who live in the modern day Coachella Valley and San Gorgonio Pass areas. The Agua Caliente Reservation occupies 32,000 acres (13,000 ha), of which 6,700 acres (2,700 ha) lie within the city limits, making the Agua Caliente band the city's largest landowner. (Tribal enrollment is currently estimated at between 296 and 365 people.)


Mexican explorers

As of 1821 Mexico was independent of Spain and in March 1823 the Mexican Monarchy ended. That same year (in December) Mexican diarist José María Estudillo and Brevet Captain José Romero were sent to find a route from Sonora to Alta California; on their expedition they first recorded the existence of "Agua Caliente" at Palm Springs, California. With the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the region was ceded to the United States in 1848.


Early names and European settlers

One possible origin of palm in the place name comes from early Spanish explorers who referred to the area as La Palma de la Mano de Dios or "The Palm of God's hand". The earliest use of the name "Palm Springs" is from United States Topographical Engineers who used the term in 1853 maps. According to William Bright, when the word "palm" appears in Californian place names, it usually refers to the native California fan palm,Washingtonia filifera, which is abundant in the Palm Springs area. Other early names were "Palmetto Spring" and "Big Palm Springs".

The first European resident in Palm Springs itself was Jack Summers, who ran the stagecoach station on the Bradshaw Trail in 1862. Fourteen years later (1876), the Southern Pacific railroad was laid 6 miles to the north, isolating the station. In 1880, local Indian Pedro Chino was selling parcels near the springs to William Van Slyke and Mathew Bryne in a series of questionable transactions; they in turn brought in W. R. Porter to help market their property through the "Palm City Land and Water Company". By 1885, when San Francisco attorney (later known as "Judge") John Guthrie McCallum began buying property in Palm Springs, the name was already in wide acceptance. The area was named "Palm Valley" when McCallum incorporated the "Palm Valley Land and Water Company" with partners O.C. Miller, H.C. Campbell, and James Adams, M.D.


Land development and drought

McCallum, who had brought his ill son to the dry climate for health, brought in irrigation advocate Dr. Oliver Wozencroft and engineer J. P. Lippincott to help construct a canal from the Whitewater River to fruit orchards on his property. He also asked Dr. Welwood Murray to establish a hotel across the street from his residence. Murray did so in 1886 (he later became a famous horticulturalist). The crops and irrigation systems suffered flooding in 1893 from record rainfall, and then an 11-year drought (1894–1905) caused further damage.


20th century

The city became a fashionable resort in the 1900s when health tourists arrived with conditions that required dry heat. Because of the heat, however, the population dropped markedly in the summer months. In 1906 naturalist and travel writer George Wharton James' two volumeThe Wonders of the Colorado Desert described Palm Springs as having "great charms and attractiveness" and included an account of his stay at Murray's hotel. As James also described, Palm Springs was more comfortable in its microclimate because the area was covered in the shadow of Mount San Jacinto to the west and in the winter the mountains block cold winds from the San Gorgonio pass. Early illustrious visitors included John Muir and his daughters, U.S. Vice President Charles Fairbanks, and Fanny Stevenson, widow of Robert Louis Stevenson; still, Murray's hotel was closed in 1909 and torn down in 1954.

Nellie N. Coffman and her physician husband Harry established The Desert Inn as a hotel and sanitarium in 1909. It was expanded as a modern hotel in 1927 and continued on until 1967. Coffman herself was a "driving force" in the city's tourism industry until her death in 1950.

James' Wonders of the Colorado Desert was followed in 1920 by J. Smeaton Chase's Our Araby: Palm Springs and the Garden of the Sun, which also served to promote the area. In 1924 Pearl McCallum (daughter of Judge McCallum) returned to Palm Springs and built the Oasis Hotel with her husband Austin G. McManus; the Modern/Art Deco resort was designed by Lloyd Wright and featured a 40-foot tower.

The next major hotel was the El Mirador, a large and luxurious resort that attracted the biggest movie stars; opening in 1927, its prominent feature was a 68-foot tall Renaissance style tower.Silent film star Fritzi Ridgeway's 100-room Hotel del Tahquitz was built in 1929, next to the "Fool's Folly" mansion built by Chicago heiress Lois Kellogg.Golfing was available at the O'Donnell 9 hole course (1926) and the El Mirador (1929) course. Hollywood movie stars were attracted by the hot dry, sunny weather and seclusion – they built homes and estates in the Warm Sands, The Mesa, and Historic Tennis Club neighborhoods. About 20,000 visitors came to the area in 1922.

Palm Springs became popular with movie stars in the 1930s and estate building expanded into the Movie Colony neighborhoods, Tahquitz River Estates, and Las Palmas neighborhoods. Actors Charles Farrell and Ralph Bellamy opened the Racquet Club in 1934 and Pearl McCallum opened the Tennis Club in 1937. Nightclubs were set up as well, with Al Wertheimer opening The Dunes outside of Palm Springs in 1934 and the Chi Chi nightclub opening in 1936. Besides the gambling available at the Dunes Club, other casinos included The 139 Club and The Cove Club outside of the city. Southern California's first self-contained shopping center was established in Palm Springs as the Plaza Shopping Center in 1936.


World War II

When the United States entered World War II, Palm Springs and the Coachella Valley were important in the war effort. The original airfield near Palm Springs became a staging area for the Air Corps Ferrying Command's 21st Ferrying Group in November 1941 and a new airfield was built ½ mile from the old site. The new airfield, designated Palm Springs Army Airfield, was completed in early 1942. Personnel from the Air Transport Command 560th Army Air Forces Base Unit stayed at the La Paz Guest Ranch and training was conducted at the airfield by the 72nd and 73rd Ferrying Squadrons. Later training was provided by the IV Fighter Command 459th Base Headquarters and Air Base Squadron.

Eight months before Pearl Harbor Day, the El Mirador Hotel was fully booked and adding new facilities. After the war started, the U.S. government bought the hotel from owner Warren Phinney for $750,000  and converted it into the Torney General Hospital, with Italian prisoners of war serving as kitchen help and orderlies in 1944 and 1945. Through the war it was staffed with 1,500 personnel and treated some 19,000 patients.

General Patton's Desert Training Center encompassed the entire region, with its headquarters in Camp Young at the Chiriaco Summit and an equipment depot maintained by the 66th Ordnance in present-day Palm Desert.


Post World War II

Architectural modernists flourished with commissions from the stars, using the city to explore architectural innovations, new artistic venues, and an exotic back-to-the-land experiences. Inventive architects designed unique vacation houses, such as steel houses with prefabricated panels and folding roofs, a glass-and-steel house in a boulder-strewn landscape, and a carousel house that turned to avoid the sun's glare.

In 1946 Richard Neutra designed the Edgar and Liliane Kaufmann House. A modernist classic, this mostly glass residence incorporated the latest technological advances in building materials, using natural lighting and floating planes and flowing space for proportion and detail. In recent years an energetic preservation program has protected and enhanced many classic buildings.

Culver (2010) argues that Palm Springs architecture became the model for mass-produced suburban housing, especially in the Southwest. This "Desert Modern" style was a high-end architectural style featuring open-design plans, wall-to-wall carpeting, air-conditioning, swimming pools, and very large windows. As Culver concludes, "While environmentalists might condemn desert modern, the masses would not. Here, it seemed, were houses that fully merged inside and outside, providing spaces for that essential component of Californian—and indeed middle-class American—life: leisure. While not everyone could have a Neutra masterpiece, many families could adopt aspects of Palm Springs modern."

Hollywood values permeated the resort as it combined celebrity, health, new wealth, and sex. As Culver (2010) explains: "The bohemian sexual and marital mores already apparent in Hollywood intersected with the resort atmosphere of Palm Springs, and this new, more open sexuality would gradually appear elsewhere in national tourist culture." During this period, the city government, stimulated by real estate developers systematically removed and excluded poor people and Indians.

Palm Springs was pictured by the French photographer Robert Doisneau in November 1960 as part of an assignment for Fortune on the construction of golf courses in this particularly dry and hot area of the Colorado desert. Doisneau submitted around 300 slides following his ten-day stay depicting the lifestyle of wealthy retirees and Hollywood stars in the 1960s. At the time, Palm Springs counted just 19 courses, which had grown to 125 by 2010.

Climate

Palm Springs has a hot desert climate, with over 300 days of sunshine and around 4.83 inches (122.7 mm) of rain annually. The winter months are warm, with a majority of days reaching 70 °F (21 °C) and in January and February days often see temperatures of 80 °F (27 °C) and on occasion reach over 90 °F (32 °C), while, on average, there are 17 nights annually dipping to or below 40 °F (4 °C); freezing temperatures occur in less than half of years. The lowest temperature recorded is 19 °F (−7 °C), on January 22, 1937. Summer often sees daytime temperatures above 110 °F (43 °C) coupled with warm overnight lows remaining above 80 °F (27 °C). The mean annual temperature is 74.6 °F (23.7 °C). There are 180 days with a high reaching 90 °F (32 °C), and 100 °F (38 °C) can be seen on 116 days. The highest temperature on record in Palm Springs is 123 °F (51 °C), most recently achieved on July 28 and 29, 1995.

Climate data for Palm Springs

MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)95
(35)
99
(37)
104
(40)
112
(44)
116
(47)
122
(50)
123
(51)
123
(51)
121
(49)
116
(47)
102
(39)
93
(34)
123
(51)
Average high °F (°C)70.8
(21.6)
74.0
(23.3)
80.4
(26.9)
87.7
(30.9)
95.7
(35.4)
103.7
(39.8)
108.1
(42.3)
107.3
(41.8)
101.9
(38.8)
91.2
(32.9)
78.5
(25.8)
69.2
(20.7)
89.0
(31.7)
Average low °F (°C)45.4
(7.4)
48.0
(8.9)
52.2
(11.2)
57.4
(14.1)
64.3
(17.9)
70.8
(21.6)
77.5
(25.3)
77.6
(25.3)
71.9
(22.2)
62.3
(16.8)
51.6
(10.9)
44.1
(6.7)
60.3
(15.7)
Record low °F (°C)19
(−7)
24
(−4)
29
(−2)
34
(1)
36
(2)
44
(7)
54
(12)
52
(11)
46
(8)
30
(−1)
23
(−5)
23
(−5)
19
(−7)
Source: NOAA

Geography

Palm Springs is located at 33°49′26″N 116°31′49″W (33.823990, −116.530339) in theSonoran Desert. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 95.0 square miles (246 km2), of which 94.1 square miles (244 km2) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km2) (1%) is water. Located in the Coachella Valley desert region, Palm Springs is sheltered by the San Bernardino Mountains to the north, the Santa Rosa Mountains to the south, by the San Jacinto Mountains to the west and by the Little San Bernardino Mountains to the east.

Economy

Though celebrities still retreat to Palm Springs, many today establish residences in other areas of the Coachella Valley. The city's economy now relies on tourism, and local government is largely supported by related retail sales taxes and the TOT (transient occupancy tax). It is a city of numerous festivals, conventions, and international events including the Palm Springs International Film Festival.

The world's largest rotating aerial tramcars (cable cars) can be found at the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway. These cars, built by Von Roll Tramways, ascend from Chino Canyon two-and-a-half miles up a steep incline to the station at 8,516 feet (2,596 m). The San Jacinto Wilderness is accessible from the top of the tram and there is a restaurant with notable views.

The Palm Springs Convention Center underwent a multimillion-dollar expansion and renovation under Mayor Will Kleindienst. The City Council Sub-Committee of Mayor Kleindienst and City Council Member Chris Mills selected Fentress Bradburn Architects from Denver, Colorado for the redesign.

Numerous hotels, restaurants and attractions cater to tourists, while shoppers can find a variety of high-end boutiques in downtown and uptown Palm Springs. The city is home to 20 clothing-optional resorts catering to gay men.

Subdivisions

The City of Palm Springs has developed a program to identify distinctive neighborhoods in the community.  Of the 33 neighborhoods, 7 have historical and cultural significance.


Movie Colony neighborhoods

The Movie Colony is just east of Palm Canyon Drive. The Movie Colony East neighborhood extends further east from the Ruth Hardy Park. These areas started growing in the 1930s as Hollywood movie stars built their smaller getaways from their Los Angeles area estates. Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, Estée Lauder, and Bing Crosby built homes in these neighborhoods.


El Rancho Vista Estates

In the 1960s, Robert Fey built 70 homes designed by Donald Wexler and Ric Harrison in the El Rancho Vista Estates. Noted residents included Jack LaLanne and comic Andy Dick.


Warm Sands

Historic homes in the Warm Sands area date from the 1920s and many were built from adobe. It also includes small resorts and the Ramon Mobile Home Park. Noted residents have included screenwriter Walter Koch, artist Paul Grimm, activist Cleve Jones and actor Wesley Eure.


The Mesa

The Mesa started off as a gated community developed in the 1920s near the Indian Canyons. Noted residents have included King Gillette, Zane Grey, Clark Gable, Carole Lombard, Suzanne Somers, Herman Wouk, Henry Fernandez, Barry Manilow and Trina Turk. Distinctive homes include Wexler's "butterfly houses" and the "Streamline Moderne Ship of the Desert".


Tahquitz River Estates

Some of the homes in this neighborhood date from the 1930s. The area was owned by Pearl McCallum McManus and she started building homes in the neighborhood after World War II ended. Dr. William Scholl (Dr. Scholl's foot products) owned a 10-acre estate here. Today the neighborhood is the largest neighborhood organization with 600 homes and businesses within its boundaries.


Sunmor Estates

During World War II, the original Sunmor Estates area was the western portion the Palm Springs Army Airfield. Homes here were developed by Robert Higgins and the Alexander Construction Company. Actor and former mayor Frank Bogert bought his home for $16,000 and lived there for more than 50 years.


Historic Tennis Club

Impoverished artist Carl Eytel first set up his cabin on what would become the Tennis Club in 1937. Another artist in the neighborhood, who built his Moroccan-style "Dar Marrac" estate in 1924, was Gordon Coutts. Other estates include Samuel Untermyer's Mediterranean style villa (now The Willows Historic Palm Springs Inn), the Casa Cody Inn, built by Harriet and Harold William Cody (cousin of Buffalo Bill Cody) and the Ingleside Inn, built in the 1920s by the Humphrey Birge family. The neighborhood now has about 400 homes, condos, apartments, inns and restaurants.


Las Palmas neighborhoods

To the west of Palm Canyon Drive are the Vista Las Palmas, Old Las Palmas, and Little Tuscany neighborhoods. These areas also feature distinctive homes and celebrity estates.


Racquet Club Estates

Historic Racquet Club Estates, located north of Vista Chino, is home to over five hundred mid-century modern homes from the Alexander Construction Company. "Meiselman" homes, and the famed Wexler steel homes (having Class One historic designation) are also prominent in the area. Racquet Club Estates was Palm Springs' first middle income neighborhood.


Deepwell Estates

Deepwell Estates, the eastern portion of the square mile defined by South/East Palm Canyon, Mesquite, and Sunrise, contains around 370 homes, including notable homes architecturally and of celebrity figures. Among the celebrities who lived in the neighborhood are Jerry Lewis, Loretta Young, Liberace, and William Holden.

Internet, Comunication

 

Prices in Palm Springs

PRICES LIST - USD

MARKET / SUPERMARKET

Milk1 liter$0.98
Tomatoes1 kg$3.50
Cheese0.5 kg$7.00
Apples1 kg$4.50
Oranges1 kg$3.60
Beer (domestic)0.5 l$2.25
Bottle of Wine1 bottle$12.00
Coca-Cola2 liters$2.18
Bread1 piece$2.55
Water1.5 l$1.86

PRICES LIST - USD

RESTAURANTS

Dinner (Low-range)for 2$32.00
Dinner (Mid-range)for 2$55.00
Dinner (High-range)for 2$
Mac Meal or similar1 meal$7.00
Water0.33 l$1.50
Cappuccino1 cup$4.15
Beer (Imported)0.33 l$6.00
Beer (domestic)0.5 l$5.00
Coca-Cola0.33 l$1.85
Coctail drink1 drink$12.50

PRICES LIST - USD

ENTERTAINMENT

Cinema2 tickets$24.00
Gym1 month$45.00
Men’s Haircut1 haircut$21.00
Theatar2 tickets$
Mobile (prepaid)1 min.$0.13
Pack of Marlboro1 pack$6.00

PRICES LIST - USD

PERSONAL CARE

Antibiotics1 pack$20.00
Tampons32 pieces$9.00
Deodorant50 ml.$4.30
Shampoo400 ml.$5.70
Toilet paper4 rolls$3.70
Toothpaste1 tube$2.00

PRICES LIST - USD

CLOTHES / SHOES

Jeans (Levis 501 or similar)1$53.00
Dress summer (Zara, H&M)$48.00
Sport shoes (Nike, Adidas)$90.00
Leather shoes1$105.00

PRICES LIST - USD

TRANSPORTATION

Gasoline1 liter$0.80
TaxiStart$
Taxi1 km$
Local Transport1 ticket$1.75

Tourist (Backpacker)  

63 $ per day

Estimated cost per 1 day including:

  • meals in cheap restaurant
  • public transport
  • cheap hotel

Tourist (business/regular)  

277 $ per day

Estimated cost per 1 day including:

  • mid-range meals and drinks
  • transportation
  • hotel

Transportation - Get In

Transportation - Get In

By plane

  • Palm Springs International Airport (IATA: PSP), 3400 E Tahquitz Canyon Way.Located right in the heart of Palm Springs. Scheduled daily flight connections with major cities throughout the United States and Canada. Served by Westjet and all major US airlines except Southwest. Palm Springs International Airport is also popular for general aviation and business jet travelers. Air taxi and aircraft charter companies provide private aircraft charter services from this airport. You can take Palm Springs bus number 24 to go from the airport to downtown Palm Springs. The bus does not stop right at the terminal; you'll need to catch the bus one block west of the airport at Civic Drive and East Tahquitz Canyon Way.
  • LA/Ontario International Airport. Located in Ontario, about 70 miles to the west of Palm Springs, has many more flight connections and is the closest airport served by Southwest Airlines.

Transportation - Get In

By Train

  • Amtrak has a station at 300 North Indian Canyon Drive (.6 mi south of Interstate 10), 1-800-USA-RAIL (872-7245). Amtrak's Sunset Limited route connects Palm Springs with Los Angeles and with Arizona and points eastward with three westbound and three eastbound trains per week (arriving Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday). Amtrak also provides Palm Springs with connections to and from the San Joaquins trains, which run up California's Central Valley to the Bay Area and Sacramento, via multiple daily Amtrak Thruway motorcoach runs to and from Bakersfield. Be aware that there are no rental car agencies that provide shuttles to the Amtrak station in Palm Springs and there is no public transportation available there. The "station" is really just an open platform without any building. Taxis from the Palm Springs Amtrak to the Palm Springs airport (where the rental cars are available) is about $30 (2008). The Amtrak bus station is at 200 E Taquitz Canyon Road, and is the preferred method to get to Palm Springs via Amtrak. The LA/Orange County line runs through Fullerton and has only one stop between there and Palm Springs, at downtown Riverside.
  • Another option is to take the Surfliner train to Fullerton. Then, take an Amtrak motorcoach to Palm Springs Airport or downtown Palm Springs. The Amtrak bus stop is at 190 North Indian Canyon Drive.

 

Transportation - Get In

By Car

From Los Angeles take Interstate 10 or Route 60 East towards Phoenix – 2 hours. FromSan Diego take Interstate 215 north to Route 60 East – 2 hours. From Phoenix take Interstate 10 West to Indian Canyon South – 4 hours. From Las Vegas take Interstate 15 South to Interstate 10 East (in San Bernardino) – 4 hours.


Transportation - Get Around

Palm Springs has a pedestrian friendly downtown. Visitors can enjoy the palm tree lined streets along Palm Canyon Drive and Indian Canyon Drive. Many boutique shops, outdoor restaurant and art galleries line the streets.

Transportation - Get Around

By car

Rent a car at the airport, or if you want to splurge, numerous limousine services are available, including West Coast Transportation, Cardiff Limousine and A-1 Sahara Limo.

The main thoroughfares through downtown are one-way only between Alejo and Ramon. Palm Canyon Drive is the southern route, and the home to most restaurants, hotels, and entertainment venues. Indian Canyon Drive runs north, and also has many, though fewer, attractions. Highway 111 runs south from I-10, then east-west along the hill side and connects all the cities in the Palm Springs area. This road has lights and lots of traffic, so if you are going far, you should drive out and hop onto Interstate 10. S.

Palm Canyon Drive is usually busy and can be hard to find a parking place on the weekends and at night. There is ample free parking in the many city owned parking lots and garages, except for Thursday through Saturday nights.

Most of the major car rental companies are represented at the airport.

Transportation - Get Around

By bus/limo/car

Route 111 serves downtown Palm Springs south of Vista Chino. Route 24 servers the northern part of downtown Palm Springs (north of East Tachevah Drive)

  • Sun Bus, toll-free: +1-800-347-8628. Run by the city, has routes around the town and to some neighboring resort cities. Fares for one ride are: $1.00 for adults 18-59, 85¢ for youths 5-17, 50¢ for seniors 60+, with medicaid and disabled. A transfer that allows unlimited rides for two hours costs 25¢. A day pass for unlimited rides costs $3.00 for adults, $2.00 for youths between 5 and 17 years old, and $1.50 for seniors 60 years and older with a medicare card, DMV Driver License, Senior ID card, SunLine Half-Fare ID card. A 10-ride pass costs $10.00 for adults, $8.50 for youths and $5 for seniors.
  • Windsor Limousine Service+1 855-313-6080. Executive Limousine and Town Car Service.

Transportation - Get Around

By bike

Palm Springs and the surrounding environs are mostly flat and dry and can make for good cycling during the cooler months. Numerous rental facilities can be found around town.

 

Hotels

- BEST RATED -

Hotels

- BEST VALUE -

Restaurants

The annual Palm Springs Desert Resorts Restaurant Week offers an opportunity to try a number of restaurants at a discounted rate.

  • Rainbow Bar & Grill216 S. Indian Canyon Ave. The best Sunday brunch downtown.
  • Tylers Burgers149 South Indian Canyon Dr. This small hamburger joint, famous for their sliders, is considered by locals to have the best hamburgers in Palm Springs. Only open for lunch. Be sure to get there early or be prepared to wait.
  • Kaiser Grille205 S. Palm Canyon Dr+1 760 323-1003. Good American food right in the middle of downtown Palm Springs.
  • The Chop House262 S. Palm Canyon Dr,  +1 760 320-4500. Steakhouse along the main drag of Palm Springs.
  • Le Vallauris385 W. Tahquitz Canyon Way+1 760 325-5059. Expensive, but good French food off of S. Palm Canyon Drive.
  • Riccio's Steak & Seafood495 N Palm Canyon Dr. Steak and seafood from an iconic restaurant family. Patio dining on Palm Canyon Drive.
  • El Mirasol1450 E. Palm Canyon Dr. Voted the best Mexican food in the desert by the readers of Palm Springs Life.
  • Melvyn's200 W. Ramon Rd. Old world style featured on "Lifestyles of the Rich & Famous. Live entertainment and happening bar scene.
  • Margarita's1000 E/ Tahquitz Canyon. Eclectic menu from Mexican to Steak and Sushi. Live entertainment.

Things to do

  • Palm Springs Aerial Tramway1 Tramway Rd,  +1 760 325-1391. The "one" thing to do in Palm Springs if you only have a limited amount of time, and a good place to go to get away from the heat. Incredible views at night, and snow in the winter. Beware that the official address, is the address of the Visitor Center. To get to the tram car base station, you need to drive 10 minutes or walk about 2 hours. There is no shuttle.
  • Indian Canyons. Tahquitz Canyon, Palm Canyon, Andreas Canyon and Murray Canyon, were sacred Native sites, now open to the public for hiking.
  • Palm Springs Art Museum101 Museum Dr+1 760 325-7186. Founded in 1933, the museum hosts special exhibits and work from its permanent collection which includes Ruscha, Robert Arneson, Nathan, Charles Russell, Frederic Remington and Native American and Mesoamerican Art.
  • Palm Springs Air Museum745 N. Gene Autry Trail,  +1 760 778-6262. Nice place to go to if you have half a day to spare. Home to great condition WWII airplanes, etc.
  • Palm Springs International Film Festival. Held the first two weeks of January. One of the largest film festivals in North America. A star-studded black tie gala, it is open to public with the purchase of gala tickets.
  • Palm Springs International Festival of Short Films. Largest short film festival in North America; second largest in the world. An Academy sanctioned festival. Fifty of the short films screened at this festival have been nominated for Academy Awards. The public can meet up-and-coming directors and actors at special parties.
  • Agua Caliente Cultural Museum219 S. Palm Canyon Dr,  +1 760 778-1079. The history and culture of the Agua Caliente Tribe is on display. Admission is free.

Golf


Gaming

  • Spa Resort Casino401 E. Amado Rd,  +1 760 883-1000. Offers live entertainment, restaurants, a players club, and over 1000 slot machines.

Festivals and events

  • Thursdays – Thursday Street Fair, downtown with craft and food booths, and during the spring season live music
  • Saturdays - Farmers Market, 8AM–12:30PM adjacent to the Camelot Theatres at 2300 E. Baristo Road (2 miles from downtown)

and a Saturday Flea Market in nearby Palm Desert

January–March

  • Palm Springs International Film Festival
  • Modernism Week
  • Desert Concours d’Elegance
  • Festival of Native Film & Culture
  • Tour de Palm Springs

April–June

  • Arthur Lyons’ Film Noir Festival
  • Restaurant Week
  • ANA Inspiration – One of the five major championships of women's golf, held at Mission Hills Country Club and ending on the first Sunday of April.
  • Girls Weekend (formerly Dinah Shore Weekend) – An annual gathering of lesbians (and those who sympathize with LGBT causes) that coincides with the ANA Inspiration. (The former name of "Dinah Shore Weekend" honors the late entertainer, who founded the golf tournament that once bore her name.)
  • White Party

July–September

  • Palm Springs International Festival of Short Films
  • 4 July Celebration
  • Cinema Diverse Gay and Lesbian Films

October–December

  • American Heat Bike Show
  • Exotic Car Show and Auction
  • Greater Palm Springs Pride
  • Festival of Lights Parade
  • Veterans Day Parade
  • Walk of the Inns
  • Tree Lighting Ceremony at Aerial Tramway

Safety in Palm Springs

Stay Safe

Very High / 9.5

Safety (Walking alone - day)

Mid. / 5.5

Safety (Walking alone - night)

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